Isobar's report for October 2011.11.09

Posted in 2011 November

By DAVID GREEN

We made it though October without a snowflake, as we most always do, but it was a close call, said the National Weather Service’s climate observer in Morenci.

“You might have missed it,” George Isobar said, “because it didn’t last long. On Saturday afternoon, Oct. 29, there was something frozen falling from the sky.”

frosted leaves copyIsobar heard people describe it as hail, but he listed it on his report as sleet. 

“Hard to say,” Isobar said. “It didn’t seem like the kind of weather conditions to form hail and it didn’t really seem cold enough for near snow, but whatever it was, it was wet ice.”

Isobar said he heard from someone who was in Toledo that day and was really in quite a shower of the stuff for a longer period.

“There are some years when we get some measurable snow in October,” Isobar said, “but that’s a rarity.”

And in November? That’s a bit less of a rarity.

October ended with a 2.96 inches of precipitation which is pretty close to average. There was one thunderstorm during the month and plenty of foggy mornings.

“The first spotty frost was recorded Oct. 2 and the first hard frost came on the 22nd,” Isobar said. “It turned quite chilly and a lot of people were running their furnaces earlier than usual this year.”

There were three morning temperature readings in the 20s, include the low for the month of 24 on the 30th.

The high temperature of 81° was recorded Oct. 10 and two days later came the last of the days in the 70s.

The mean temperature for the month was a tenth of a degree below normal. The National Weather Service office in Toledo recorded the strongest wind of 47 miles an hour on Oct. 15.

NOVEMBER—It doesn’t seem right to be talking about snow in this weather, Isobar said Tuesday when the temperature reached a mild upper 60s, but things will soon change. In fact, the National Weather Service is calling for a change of snowflakes Thursday night.

“It’s un unusual year to have no snow in November,” he said, “but it’s also unusual to have very much.”

There have been three years in the past 36 that ended with six inches or more, but the average is closer to just a couple inches by the end of month.

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