Morenci city council 01.126.2011

Posted in 2011 January

A phase II environmental study is needed for the vacant Dunbar Auction House property on North Street, mayor Keith Pennington told city council Monday night. The building is expected to be purchased by the city and demolished to create a parking area.

The more extensive environmental work was not unexpected, said the mayor, due to the previous uses of the building that included an automotive dealership, automotive repair and furniture refinishing.

The company handling the study will begin work when the contents are removed. Council member Tracy Schell said that owner Duane Dunbar sold the contents to another party, so it might not be his to remove.

Dunbar wil be contacted in hopes of keeping the project moving forward, Pennington said.

ALPINE—Alpine Manufacturing Technologies will continue to pay rent through February on the former M&S buildings on Salisbury Street in Morenci, but operations are moving to Hudson.

Pennington said the Lenawee Economic Development Corporation is actively seeking a new tenant and is also examining ways to continue financing the cost of the building while there is no tenant.

BUDGET—City administrator/clerk Renée Schroeder is urging department heads to submit proposed funding for the next fiscal year, ahead of the proposed budget that must be presented in May.

She noted that negotiations with both unions are scheduled this year.

PAY—Scheduled pay increases were approved for police department assistant Ann Emrick and recycling center coordinator Laurie Schisler.

LIBRARY—Council approved plans by the Stair Public Library board to select Library Design Associates to select new carpet and implement their design improvements for a new young adult reading area.

The entire project project is funded by a $25,000 grant through the Reinhardt Library Fund.

RECREATION—Council approved a proposal from Conservation Design Forum (CDF) for assistance in updating the city’s five-year recreation plan.

Communities must have a current plan in place in order to apply for many recreation grants. The cost of the CDF’s work is $3,500.

CDF will first review the existing plan, compare it with state guidelines, and identify recreational components eligible for state and federal grants.

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