School bond projects 2.27

Posted in 2008 February

Griffith pointed to a problem with the elementary school water line as a sample of needs that can’t be neglected. The district paid top dollar for emergency repairs last year, he said, rather than fixing the problem so it won’t happen again.

Other needs include—

Elementary school: Replacement of cracking tile held in place by asbestos adhesive; installing energy efficient windows in the gymnasium; replacing exterior doors that are showing corrosion; replacing corroded plumbing; replacing aging toilet fixtures; repairing areas of the roof; paving the front circle drive.

High school: Addressing mechanical issues with the bleachers; replacing exterior gymnasium doors where corrosion has resulted in rotten wood on the gym floor due to water damage; sanding and refinished the gym floor; replacing several exterior doors due to corrosion; replacing the water pressure tank; replacing shower fixtures in locker rooms.

The middle school bond called for construction of a multi-purpose building for alternative education, physical education, wrestling practice and storage. The structure is completed, but still isn’t in use due to a shortage of funds to finish the interior.

District-wide: The running track has exceeded its estimated life span, but it continues to deteriorate. Nearly 70 cracks  break up the surface, in addition to several areas where the rubber surface is missing. Time and money is spent every year patching the surface in an effort to prevent injuries. The bond would cover the cost of a new track. With a properly laid foundation, only the top surface would need to be replaced in the future. The facility is used frequently by district residents, as well as for athletic events and physical education class.

Griffith said that more than $20,000 is spent annually on a variety of upgrades and maintenance for computers, software, internet service, etc. Bond money would pay for new technology equipment, proper wiring and maintenance of the existing equipment.

“What we have and how we apply it is adequate,” Griffith said, “but it always needs updating.”

New funds would also cover instructional needs such as smartboards, projectors and increased long-distance learning opportunities.

The board will also explore energy-saving initiatives and perhaps take what Griffith calls some simple steps to make the district a shade of “green”—both for cost savings and for student involvement.

“We won’t approach it just because it’s trendy,” Griffith said. “It has to make financial sense.”

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