Editorials

Fayette's water: Time to think about the future 2010.02.02

Written by David Green. Posted in Editorials

It’s certainly no secret that Fayette is blessed with a water source that no other community in Fulton County possesses. While other parts of the county buy water from Toledo, collect precipitation in reservoirs and purify water from sources such as Bean Creek, Fayette has the luxury of tapping its own wells—a seemingly endless supply.

Fayette’s secret? It's a simple matter of geography. The community is located on the edge of the massive Michindoh Aquifer. A giant sponge of water formed when mile-thick glaciers melted thousands of years ago. The aquifer now supplies drinking water to more than 20 communities, but to only one in Fulton County.

At Fayette’s last council meeting, a county commissioner spoke about the increasing costs of Toledo’s water and the need to explore other sources. Other than bringing in water from the Maumee River, there really is no other good source but Fayette.

At that same meeting, Fayette mayor Ruth Marlatt gave her State of the Village address that included these words that likely referred to the community’s water supply: “Our responsibility is to see that those resources are managed in such a way that benefits our residents, both in the short and long term.”

Fayette has plenty of water to sell, but its chief goal should not be to bolster the economic growth of other communities in the county. Of course there’s room for collaboration and sharing resources, but Fayette needs to be in charge of this process and not lose control of its valuable resource.

The commissioner’s word should have alerted Fayette council members of what is on the horizon. The village has something that other communities desire and the time to begin discussing this important issue is now.

Weekly newspaper serving SE Michigan and NW Ohio - State Line Observer ©2006-2014