Morenci school survey reviewed 2013.03.13

Written by David Green.


The Morenci school district received grades similar to most other schools in the county from a survey organized by the Lenawee ISD. Overall favorability stands at about 77 percent among all county schools.

In Morenci, teachers were chosen as the district's greatest asset by a much larger margin than the county average, however, the percentage of parents saying the school district is heading in the right direction was lower.

More than a thousand county residents were randomly chosen from those living in the 11 public school districts for a telephone survey undertaken in December. 

"All superintendents worked together to shape questions," said Morenci superintendent Michael Osborne, then the research firm of Banach, Banach and Cassidy developed the survey. The survey was given a 95 percent level of confidence for accuracy, with a sampling error rate of ±2.9 percent. This means the data from any particular survey question could actually be about three percent higher or lower.

The public's attitudes about locals schools showed general satisfaction, Osborne said.

In the Morenci district, 67 parents of students were questioned, along with 20 residents who don't have children in school.

Respondents were asked to give their district an overall grade and 75 percent gave Morenci A and B grades. Twenty-seven percent of parents awarded the district an A and 10 percent of non-parents gave an A. All county schools together received A and B grades from 77 percent of those surveyed.

Morenci's educational program received an 80 percent positive rating (all A and B grades) compared to 79 percent county-wide. Parents were much more likely to award an A grade. 

Fifty-eight percent gave the school board a positive rating, however 15 percent gave no grade at all. The quality of teaching garnered a 72 percent favorable rating (79 for the county), and again, parents gave a much higher grade than non-parents.

Administrators earned a 58 percent favorability rating in Morenci compared to 72 percent in the county total. Twelve percent of the Morenci residents gave no response.

In the final questions receiving a grade, 62 percent said the school adequately prepares students for careers and work (with no response from 10 percent) and an equal number gave a positive response about preparing students for college (no response from 11 percent).

Residents were then asked their opinions on a variety of school-related topics, starting with the main barriers to prevent local students from attending college. Forty percent faulted the cost of college, 10 percent cited a lack of help from counselors and other school officials, and 18 percent gave no response. About a quarter of the non-parents spoke of a lack of scholarships and financial aid.

In Morenci, 47 percent of respondents said they were very well informed about school issues and 33 were somewhat informed. Newspapers were cited as the chief source of information, followed by friends and neighbors, classroom teachers, and students. In other districts, the school website was listed as the main source of information by parents. For non-parents, 43 percent of Morenci residents listed the newspaper as the main source and 28 percent did county-wide.

Respondents listed curriculum issues as the type of information they are most interested in, followed by school events, financial information and test scores. Information about athletics was ranked low on the list.

Teachers were rated as the greatest strength of the school district (30 percent by Morenci parents and 22 percent county-wide; 40 percent by non-parents and 19 percent county-wide). The small-town environment was next on the list of strengths. 

Half of those questioned listed finances as the district's greatest challenge—much higher than the county-wide figure—while bullying, curriculum improvement and finding qualified staff members were much further down the list.

Residents are well aware of efforts to trim costs and they favor collaboration and sharing staff by a 64-31 margin. Contracting with private companies for services such as bus drivers and custodial chores was supported only 34 to 56 percent, and consolidation with another district was given even worse favorability, 25 to 68.

More than half of Morenci respondents are opposed to a marketing program to recruit students from other school districts. The development of additional charter schools was viewed unfavorably, 13-66. Ninety-two percent of Morenci residents see the school as a safe place for students.

Supt. Osborne sees potential problems with passage of the May 7 bond vote because 78 percent of those surveyed saw no need for renovation and repair of school facilities. The bond vote will ask residents to extend an existing bond for the purpose of maintenance needs. The school board will need to educate residents about the physical needs of the school district.

About 67 percent said the quality of the Morenci school district is the same or better than neighboring districts—about 10 percent less than the county average—and an equal number said that Morenci offers enough extracurricular activities.

The lunch program was rated 64-30 for nutritious meals and efforts to eliminate bullying was rated 70-20.

Perhaps the most troubling aspect of the survey for Morenci administrators came at the end of the questioning when 64 percent indicated the district is headed in the right direction. For the county as a whole, the figure stood at 80 percent.

Parents were asked why they think families might enroll their children in neighboring districts. A stronger academic program was listed by 21 percent, better discipline and better teachers each were listed by 15 percent. Four of the 67 parents interviewed send their children to other districts. Percentages were similar throughout the county.

The LISD TECH Center program was seen positively by about 75 percent of those interviewed; 11 percent had no opinion.

  • Front.cowboy
    A PERFORMER named Biligbaatar, a member of the AnDa Union troupe from Inner Mongolia, dances at Stair District Library last week during a visit to the Midwest. The nine-member group blends a variety of traditions from Inner and Outer Mongolia. The music is described as drawing from “all the Mongol tribes that Genghis Khan unified.” The group considers itself music gatherers whose goal is to preserve traditional sounds of Mongolia. Biligbaatar grew up among traditional herders who live in yurts. Additional photos are on the back page of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.base Ball
    UMPIRE Thomas Henthorn tosses the bat between team captains Mikayla Price and Chuck Piskoti of Flint’s Lumber City Base Ball Club. Following the 1860 rules, after the bat was grabbed by the captains, captains’ hands advanced to the top of the bat—one hand on top of the other. The captain whose hand ended up on top decided who would bat first. Additional photos of Sunday’s game appear on page 12 of this week’s Observer. The contest was organized in conjunction with Stair District Library’s Hometown Teams exhibit that runs through Nov. 20.
    VALUE OF ATHLETICS—Morenci graduate John Bancroft (center) takes a turn at the microphone during a chat session at the opening of the Hometown Teams exhibit at Stair District Library. Clockwise to his left is John Dillon, Jed Hall, Jim Bauer, Joe Farquhar, George Hollstein, George Vereecke and Mike McDowell. Thomas Henthorn (at the podium) kicked off the conversation. Henthorn, a University of Michigan–Flint professor, will return to Morenci this Sunday to lead a game of vintage base ball at the school softball field.
  • Front.cross
    HUDSON RUNNER Jacob Morgan looks toward the top of the hill with dismay during the tough finish at Harrison Lake State Park. Fayette runner Jacob Garrow focuses on the summit, also, during the Eagle Invitational cross country run Saturday morning. Continuing rain and drizzle made the course even more challenging. Results of the race are in this week’s Observer.
  • Front.bear
    HOLDEN HUTCHISON gives a hug to a black bear cub—the product of a taxidermist’s skills—at the Michigan DNR’s Great Youth Jamboree. The event on Sunday marked the fourth year of the Jamboree. Additional photos are on page 12.
  • Front.crossing
    Crossing over—Jim Heiney was given a U.S. flag to carry by George Vereecke (behind Jim in the hat), turning him into the leader of the parade. Bridge Walk participants cross over Bean Creek while, in the background, members of the Morenci Legion Riders cross the main traffic bridge on East Street South. Additional photos appear on the back page of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.hose Testing
    HOSE safety—The FireCatt hose testing company from Troy put Morenci Fire Department hose to the test Monday morning when Mill Street was closed to traffic. The company also checks nozzles and ladders for wear in an effort to keep fire fighters safe while on calls.

Weekly newspaper serving SE Michigan and NW Ohio - State Line Observer ©2006-2016