Fayette council 2013.02.27

Written by David Green.


Fayette village council members are now searching for not just one new village employee but two.

Maintenance coordinator Matt Moats put in a final day with the village on Friday before resigning to work full-time with a trucking business. Moats was working part time with the trucking company, said Fayette village administrator Steve Blue, and decided to concentrate on that job alone.

Moats was offered a salary increase in an effort to continue his employment with the village, but the offer was rejected. Moats was a valuable employee with good mechanical skills, Blue said.

Council members were already discussing the need for a second full-time village worker and now they will be advertising for two people.

At a committee-of-the-whole meeting last week, council discussed changing the job descriptions so that one worker would be in charge of water and sewer—with a license to operate the systems—while the other would focus on streets, grounds and equipment maintenance.

The village crew has put in a lot of overtime work since the sewer construction work got underway, Blue said. Gleason Construction, the sewer contractor, works until 5 p.m. and many of the water main breaks have occurred in the late afternoon.

When a sewer project-related break occurs, a determination must be made of who is responsible for the problem. In some cases a water line was marked and a break occurred; other times a line was not marked correctly.

Blue said that Gleason has now furnished a schedule outlining the company's proposed timeline for the project.

OHIO STREET—The cost of laying a new water line along Ohio Street—an area with frequent breaks—is estimated at $44,000. Blue will submit a proposal to the Ohio EPA in hopes of including that work in the sewer project.

TRW—Blue received preliminary drawings for a project to widen the road at the TRW factory. After a few remaining questions are answered by Arcadis, the village engineering firm, Blue intends to seek bids for that project and the village-wide paving project together. It's possible the work will be done in conjunction with paving for the sewer project, scheduled in late June.

POLICE—Council discussed police chief Jason Simon's request to hire a third full-time police officer to assist Simon and Chris Garcia. Simon has told council in the past that part-time officers are becoming more difficult to find. Some are finding full-time jobs in other communities and they often have other jobs that conflict with Fayette's needs.

Simon spoke with council about the use of prison labor to assist the village crew. In the past, Chief Simon provided transportation for the prisoners, but with the shortage of part-time officers, Simon believes he should remain in the village as much as possible.

WATER POLICY—Blue spoke to council about the need for a written policy relating to water payments and service shut-offs. 

"Dee [Lawrence] was here for a long time and operated on experience," Blue said.

With Lawrence's retirement, Blue and village fiscal officer Lisa Zuver are in charge of water payments and they would like a policy to follow. A policy exists for making late payments, Blue said, but it's not specific enough.

PARK—Council learned that the park board will explore the cost of completely closing in the walking track on Eagle Street to allow dogs to run free in the area. The track is mostly enclosed by a fence, but a few openings exist. If the park board doesn't want to pay for the work, council would have to decide if it's something it wants to address.

SLEDDING—Gleason Construction offered to create and seed a sledding hill with leftover soil from the sewer project. Blue suggested an area for Gleason to consider. A narrow north/south hill could be built just south of the T-ball diamond on the east side of Park Drive. Two small, unused village buildings would have to be demolished, Blue said.

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  • Front.base Ball
    UMPIRE Thomas Henthorn tosses the bat between team captains Mikayla Price and Chuck Piskoti of Flint’s Lumber City Base Ball Club. Following the 1860 rules, after the bat was grabbed by the captains, captains’ hands advanced to the top of the bat—one hand on top of the other. The captain whose hand ended up on top decided who would bat first. Additional photos of Sunday’s game appear on page 12 of this week’s Observer. The contest was organized in conjunction with Stair District Library’s Hometown Teams exhibit that runs through Nov. 20.
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    HOLDEN HUTCHISON gives a hug to a black bear cub—the product of a taxidermist’s skills—at the Michigan DNR’s Great Youth Jamboree. The event on Sunday marked the fourth year of the Jamboree. Additional photos are on page 12.
  • Front.crossing
    Crossing over—Jim Heiney was given a U.S. flag to carry by George Vereecke (behind Jim in the hat), turning him into the leader of the parade. Bridge Walk participants cross over Bean Creek while, in the background, members of the Morenci Legion Riders cross the main traffic bridge on East Street South. Additional photos appear on the back page of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.hose Testing
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