The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Front.cheers
    MACEE BEERS joins other Fayette Elementary School students for the annual Mini-Cheer performance during the half-time break at the basketball game.
  • Family.3.wide
    CHILDREN at Stair District Library’s Family Story Time toss scarves into the air during an activity. The evening program provided a mix of stories, songs, dancing, crafts and snacks Monday evening. The program is offered at 5:30 p.m. every Monday for five more weeks. The program is designed for three to five year olds and their family.
  • Front.newpaper.2
    THE INTERVIEW—Evelyn Joughin (right) records the interaction with an iPad while Jack Varga, next to her, asks questions of Morenci Elementary School principal Gail Frey. Morenci senior Sam Cool (standing) listens. Cool serves as the editor for the newspaper written by members of Mrs. Barrett’s second grade class.
  • Front.code.2
    WRITING CODE—Brock Christle (left), a Morenci fifth grade student, takes a look at the progress being made by fourth grader Anthony Lewis. Libby Rorick, a sixth grade student, is next in a line of girls trying out the coding tutorials. This year marked Morenci’s second year of participation in the Hour of Code project.
  • Front.gym.new
    REMIE RYAN (left) tries to dodge the foam wand held by Hayden Bays during physical education class at Morenci Elementary School. In the background, Lauryn Dominique and Brooklyn Williams stay clear of the tag. Second grade students were working on cardiovascular health on the first day back from vacation. For the record, Safety Tag is a very difficult sport to photograph.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.library.books
    MACK DICKSON takes a book off the “blind date” cart at the Fayette library. Patrons can choose a book without knowing what’s inside other than a general category. The books are among those designated for removal so patrons can consider them gifts. In Morenci, new books and staff favorites were chosen from the stacks and must be returned. Patrons get a piece of chocolate, too, to take on their date, but no clue about their “date.” One reader said she really enjoyed her book for a few pages, but then lost interest—so typical for a blind date.

City council OKs change in peddler ordinance 2012.10.24

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

Morenci city council members approved an ordinance amendment Monday regrading solicitors and peddlers, but it took the mayor’s final vote to get the measure through.

Morenci Chief of Police Larry Weeks brought the topic to council’s attention several weeks ago, expressing a concern that the old ordinance—requiring a licensing procedure with the police department—implies the city’s approval of a peddler.

Council worked with attorney Fred Lucas to come up with a new ordinance, but soon learned that courts have ruled it illegal to ban door-to-door sales and discriminate against certain groups. For example, the city could not ban all sales except local school groups.

A proposed ordinance came up for a vote Monday, but the vote ended in a 3-3 tie until Morenci mayor Keith Pennington joined the dissenters.

The proposal called for an eight-point registration process that councilor Brenda Spiess opposed. Jeff Bell stated that the registration process shifts the burden from the police department to the city clerk. Pennington agreed, adding that it still sounds as though the city is qualifying that sellers are legitimate.

Spiess, Bell and Pennington were joined by Robert Jennings in opposing the amendment.

On the other hand, said supporter Tracy Schell, the city will have no information about the various groups going door to door without the registration process.

Chief Weeks said his department receives calls from citizens wondering if sellers are legitimate, but generally the police aren’t even aware of the groups until someone calls. There’s an expectation, he said, that police will investigate the peddlers.

Schell was joined by Greg Braun and Rebecca Berger in voting for the amendment. 

Spiess then made a motion to pass the amendment without the registration process and vote was 4-3 in favor.

Schell expressed her disappointment, stating, “I think we’re showing even less concern. It’s a bad thing to show the public.”

Spiess said the responsibility of dealing with peddlers should rest with the homeowner and not the City. She suggested investing in a “No Solicitation” sign if a resident doesn’t want to deal with peddlers.

As approved, the amendment’s purpose is listed this way: “Door-to-door solicitation and aggressive panhandling within the City of Morenci has become a public nuisance by putting into jeopardy the physical safety and economic well being of the residents and visitors of the City of Morenci.”

The language continues to state that it will bar “unwanted solicitations and aggressive panhandling” to provide a safe physical environment.

Aggressive panhandling includes touching another person without that person’s consent, blocking the path of a person, continuing to solicit after a refusal, making remarks that could make a person feel threatened into making a donation, and soliciting within 20 feet of an automated teller machine or a bank entrance.

The ordinance prohibits aggressive panhandling and soliciting at a residence or business posting a sign “indicating in any manner that the occupants of the premises do not desire to have their privacy disturbed.”

Weekly newspaper serving SE Michigan and NW Ohio - State Line Observer ©2006-2016