The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Front.cheers
    MACEE BEERS joins other Fayette Elementary School students for the annual Mini-Cheer performance during the half-time break at the basketball game.
  • Family.3.wide
    CHILDREN at Stair District Library’s Family Story Time toss scarves into the air during an activity. The evening program provided a mix of stories, songs, dancing, crafts and snacks Monday evening. The program is offered at 5:30 p.m. every Monday for five more weeks. The program is designed for three to five year olds and their family.
  • Front.newpaper.2
    THE INTERVIEW—Evelyn Joughin (right) records the interaction with an iPad while Jack Varga, next to her, asks questions of Morenci Elementary School principal Gail Frey. Morenci senior Sam Cool (standing) listens. Cool serves as the editor for the newspaper written by members of Mrs. Barrett’s second grade class.
  • Front.code.2
    WRITING CODE—Brock Christle (left), a Morenci fifth grade student, takes a look at the progress being made by fourth grader Anthony Lewis. Libby Rorick, a sixth grade student, is next in a line of girls trying out the coding tutorials. This year marked Morenci’s second year of participation in the Hour of Code project.
  • Front.gym.new
    REMIE RYAN (left) tries to dodge the foam wand held by Hayden Bays during physical education class at Morenci Elementary School. In the background, Lauryn Dominique and Brooklyn Williams stay clear of the tag. Second grade students were working on cardiovascular health on the first day back from vacation. For the record, Safety Tag is a very difficult sport to photograph.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.library.books
    MACK DICKSON takes a book off the “blind date” cart at the Fayette library. Patrons can choose a book without knowing what’s inside other than a general category. The books are among those designated for removal so patrons can consider them gifts. In Morenci, new books and staff favorites were chosen from the stacks and must be returned. Patrons get a piece of chocolate, too, to take on their date, but no clue about their “date.” One reader said she really enjoyed her book for a few pages, but then lost interest—so typical for a blind date.

Few attend hearing for Fayette levy requests 2012.10.24

Written by David Green.

The audience was small for Fayette's public information meeting regarding two levy requests in the Nov. 6 general election, but that doesn't mean the discussion was also light. Several questions followed a presentation by village administrator Steve Blue.

Replacing the levy updates the value to current property assessments rather than simply renewing the existing value. Blue first addressed the request for replacement of the existing levy for parks and recreation. The park levy was last replaced in 1998, so it won't bring as stark a change as the general operating levy that hasn't been replaced since passage in 1968.

The park levy would bring an additional $5,600 to help with general maintenance needs including resurfacing the basketball courts, removal of dead and dying trees and stumps, ball diamond upkeep, repair of the broken scoreboard and maintenance of playground equipment.

Replacement of the 2.9-mill general operating levy would add about $21,000 to village coffers. Although the money cannot be targeted for a specific purpose, village council members know exactly how they want to use the money: to repay a 10-year loan for a street paving project. A grant covers nearly half of the $401,000 project. The village's loan costs nearly match the additional funds that replacement would bring in.

Nearly all village streets will be resurfaced either through the upcoming sewer project or through the project listed above.

Blue notes that the replacement request does not affect any property tax other than that paid to the village.

The owner of a home valued at $75,000 would pay an additional $54 a year, or about a dollar a week.

"That's something we feel is affordable to most everybody," Blue said.

For a $50,000 home, the increase would lead to an additional $36 a year. Residents who are 65 years or older, or are disabled, can apply for a homestead exemption. This subtracts $25,000 from the value of a home for taxation purposes. The exemption also applies to agricultural land.

To compute a tax rate, visit the county auditor's website at fultoncountyoh.com or call the auditor's office at 419/337-9200.

SCHEDULE—Eugene Rosinski asked when the road repair would begin. Blue said there are three projects scheduled next year: the sewer separation project; the street resurfacing; and a road project near the TRW plant. Construction should be complete by late summer or early fall.

STREETS—Rosinski also wondered about the width of streets. Some streets are narrower in certain areas, Blue said, and the aim is to create a uniform width. Curbing is not included in the project. Some areas that have streets in very good condition will not be included in the resurfacing. State highway is not included, although ODOT has scheduled repaving on U.S. 20 in 2014.

The TRW project will address the road on the north side of the plant where pavement is crumbling.

TRUCK ROUTE—Steve Snider asked about the idea to make Industrial Parkway a truck route to U.S. 127. Blue said he is not aware of any plans for that. The township owns half of the road where it passes through the village, he said, and township officials would be asked to cooperate in the cost of any improvements made in town.

Police chief Jason Simon pointed out that the creation of a truck route would probably attract a lot of car traffic, as well, something that business owners would not favor. Over the course of a day, he said, a truck passes through Fayette an average of every 90 seconds, with very few traffic incidents.

Street repair needs are one of the most frequent complaints lodged at the village office, Blue said.

"This is the time to jump on it and take advantage of that," he said about the grant/loan program.

PARKS—Rosinski wondered what would happen if the park replacement fails. Blue said there's sufficient money for basic operations, but larger projects will take longer to tackle.

Blue was asked if non-residents pay a fee to use the parks. Blue stated that fees are charged for softball tournaments and for the school to use the facilities.

Audience member Burt Blue noted that many township residents use the parks at no cost. When Blue was a park board member several years ago, the township board was approached about contributing funds to the operations of parks, but township trustees were not interested.

Administrator Blue said the some communities have joint park districts in cooperation with townships.

Mayor Ruth Marlatt suggested that costs should be examined and shown to township residents. In that way, she said, they could see how little financial support would cost and how much it would benefit the park program which is used by everyone.

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