Fayette village council 2012.11.28

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

Fayette village council members think that investing in a new backhoe now will save cash in the future thanks to a generous state purchasing plan.

Maintenance coordinator Matt Moats told council last week the village has spent about $9,000 in the past two years to repair the backhoe and about $13,000 needs to be invested in maintenance during the next year, including replacement of the bushings.

Moats said the village would receive $19,000 to trade in its current unit and a discount of $63,000 through the state purchase plan. This would lower the cost of a new $140,000 backhoe to $58,000.

Moats suggested a three-year trade-in plan because the village could trade in the new backhoe and receive more than what was spent initially for the purchase. The trade-in money could then be used to buy a new unit.

“Eventually it would pay for itself,” said councilor David Borer.

Council member Julia Ruger said there are village employees who would like a pay raise, but instead $58,000 would be spent on a backhoe.

“I have a problem spending this kind of money right now,” she said.

“That’s one thing no one is going to understand,” answered chief financial officer Liza Zuver. “The raises would not come out of these funds.”

Zuver explained that the use of certain funds is restricted. In this case, money in the street fund could not be used to pay police salaries, for example, but it could be used for equipment that will be used with street work.

Street funds come from the state primarily through taxes paid on gasoline and license fees. 

“People automatically assume you can get the money from anywhere,” said mayor Ruth Marlatt, “but it can’t be used for anything else. This money is for specific uses and this is one thing we can use it on.”

Zuver said there is $92,000 in the street fund. If council votes at the next meeting to buy the backhoe, it could be paid for in one lump sum or partially from a loan. Ruger suggested half and half and Zuver said she will check on interest rates.

Moats said that if the village spent $13,000 to refurbish the backhoe, it might last another 13 years but would have very little resale value and might require additional work. He expects no maintenance costs other than oil changes with a three-year plan.

“If the [resale] offer isn’t good enough, we can keep it,” said village administrator Steve Blue. “We’re not locked into it.”

STREETS—Dave Wheeler asked if the village was moving backwards with street paving because so many old water lines need to be replaced and the new pavement will need to be dug up.

Zuver noted that funds aren’t available for water line replacement now, but the water plant loan will be paid in 2018, along with another loan ending, and then the village might consider gradually replacing lines.

Police chief Jason Simon wondered if village workers could replace the lines on Mill Street before paving since breaks occur there frequently.

POLICE—Chief Simon told council that he’s putting in an extremely large number of overtime hours due to a shortage of personnel and he suggested hiring another full-time officer.

Simon said he will continue to work the overtime when needed.

“People are paying for coverage and I’m going to give it to them,” he said.

WATER—Jeff Merillat has offered to serve as a backup to Tom Rupp as the licensed water plant operator. Merillat will take classes, if needed, to keep his license up to date.

SEWER PROJECT—Blue said there are just a few signatures needed for property easements and he doesn’t anticipate any problems with the project moving forward.

  • Front.little Ball
    Fayette's Demetrious Whiteside (left)Skylar Lester attempt to keep the ball from going out of bounds during Morenci's recent basketball tournament for fourth and fifth grade teams. Morenci's Andrew Schmidt stands by.
  • Front.tug
    MORENCI pep rallies generally end with a tug of war. The senior class entry, shown above, did not advance to the finals. Griffin Grieder, Alaina Webster, Kyle Long and Jazmin Smith are shown at the front of the rope, giving it their best effort.
  • Accident
    FAYETTE resident Patricia Stambaugh, 64, was declared dead on the scene of a single-vehicle accident Friday morning south of Morenci. Rescue units were called around 9 a.m., but as of Tuesday, law enforcement officers had not yet determined the time of the accident. According to Ohio State Highway Patrol, Stambaugh was driving west on U.S. 20 when her Chevrolet Malibu traveled off the north side of the road and down a steep embankment, coming to rest in Bean Creek (Tiffin River).
  • Athletic Fields
    SPORTS COMPLEX—Fayette’s outdoor athletic facilities will include three ball fields for summer recreation leagues at the southwest corner of the school. The baseball and softball fields, along with the running track, will be constructed on the east side of the school. Outdoor athletic fields were not part of the new school project from 2007, but voters approved a $1.4 million levy for a school addition and the sports fields last August. Both projects are scheduled to be complete by July 20.
  • Front.teacher Leading
    PRESCHOOL MUSIC—Fayette band director Jeffrey Dunford spends the last half hour of the day leading the full-day preschool class in musical activities. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.F.band
    TROMBONISTS Jake Myers (left) and Max Baker perform Friday at the annual Senior Citizens Luncheon at Fayette High School. The National Honor Society and the FFA chapter teamed up to serve a meal to area seniors and to provide musical entertainment. Both the school band and choir performed. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.poles
    MOVING EAST—Utility workers continue their slow progress east along U.S. 20 south of Morenci. New electrical poles are put in place before wiring is moved into place.

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