Fayette village council 2012.09.05

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

Fayette will soon lose its maintenance supervisor following the resignation of Tom Clemensen. His last day on the job will be Sept. 14.

Clemensen was hired in September 2011 to fill the vacant supervisor position to lead the village work crew, but less than two months later his job was expanded to include village administrator duties.

When former administrator Amy Metz announced her resignation in October 2011, she suggested hiring Clemensen on an interim basis to serve as administrator until the village council decided on a long-term plan.

Clemensen continued to serve both positions until Steve Blue was hired as administrator in June 2012.

Clemensen will soon start a new job as the garage foreman for the Fulton County Engineer’s Office. He said he was approached by the county and asked if he was interested in the position.

“It has been a learning experience here at the village and I have few regrets,” Clemensen said, “but I feel this is an opportunity that I cannot refuse.”

Blue expects village council members to accept Clemensen’s resignation at the Sept.12 committee-of-the-whole meeting. No action toward replacing Clemensen will be taken until then.

CSO—At the Aug. 22 council meeting, Blue told councilors that approval of a $4.8 million EPA principal-forgiveness loan to stop combined sewer overflows (CSO) might occur at an Oct. 25 meeting of the EPA’s Water Pollution Control Loan Fund committee, but it’s getting less likely. The village still has some details to complete before approval of the funding is given.

The committee will meet only one additional time this year, Blue said, but that Dec. 3 date could present a problem with the need to complete all facets of the loan application process before the end of the year.

HYDRANT—Council voted to pay the Kuhlman company for supplies needed to replace a fire hydrant. Blue said he hopes to receive some insurance payment for the $2,430 project or some money from Defiance Water Recreation since a crew from the company broke the hydrant. The company used the hydrant to fill a swimming pool.

Blue said the village has no policy about the use of a hydrant by a private firm.

He told councilors that he was advised in advance that using the hydrant might cause a water main break, but the sale of the water would have brought in $200 in revenue.

“I deemed it was worth the risk. It turned out to be a mistake,” he said. “I don’t regret trying to make some money for the village.”

Councilor Mat Johnson said the decision doesn’t make sense if Blue was advised against taking that action by three people.

The resulting hydrant replacement was complicated by the lack of shutoff valves in the area and the loss of water to several village residents. 

Clemensen said that many corners were cut when the Zeigler residential addition was constructed decades ago, such as a failure to install shut-off valves.

“If the hydrant was in that kind of shape to begin with, it needs to be replaced anyway,” said council member Dave Wheeler, noting the fire safety risk.

Johnson asked how many other hydrants in town are in bad condition, and Clemensen said there are several. In addition, many of the village’s 58 hydrants do not have shut-off values.

It was a costly lesson, said mayor Ruth Marlatt, but the hydrant did need replacing. However, she added, it’s not a good idea to allow people who aren’t on the village work crew to operate hydrants.

HARRISON LAKE—Harrison Lake State Park’s lift station and sewage line to the village will no longer be part of the village sewer project. Engineering work on the park’s end of the project is not completed, but the park could still join the village system in the future.

PAVING—The village-wide street resurfacing project is moving forward and the levy replacement requests to support the project will appear on the November ballot.

Two streets were added to the sewer project, Blue said, which will allow additional paving of other streets not part of the project. The alley on the north side of the post office might be included, as well as a paving project that was promised to TRW to help with truck traffic.

Blue said he initially thought the village-wide project would cover all streets in the village that aren’t part of the sewer project, but he learned from the village engineering firm that it isn’t the case.

TRANSFER—Council voted to transfer money from the Blues Fest account to various sports programs: $2,200 to the Pony League; $600 to Little League; $200 to Girls Softball. Blue explained later that money had been appropriated to the park board’s account for the festival, but since there will not be a festival this year, money was transferred to park programs that were running over budget.

CLOSED SESSION—Council met in a closed session to discuss a personnel  discipline issue, at the request of Clemensen.

  • Play Practice
    DRAMA—Fayette schools, in conjunction with the Opera House Theater program, will present two plays Friday night at the Fayette Opera House. From the left is Autumn Black, Wyatt Mitchell, Elizabeth Myers, Jonah Perdue, Sam Myers (in the back) and Lauren Dale. Other cast members are Brynn Balmer, Mason Maginn, Ashtyn Dominique, Stephanie Munguia and Sierra Munguia. Jason Stuckey serves as the technician and Trinity Leady is the backstage manager. The plays will be performed during the day Friday for students and for the public at 7 p.m. Friday.
  • Front.F.school
    PROGRESS continues on the agriculture classroom addition at Fayette High School. The project will add 2,900 square feet of space and include an overhead door that would allow equipment to be driven inside. The building should be ready for the start of school in August. Work on ball fields and a running track is also underway.
  • Front.rover
    CLEARING THE WAY—Road crossings in the area on the construction route of the Rover natural gas pipeline are marked with poles and flags as preliminary work nears. Ditches and field entry points are covered with thick planks in many areas to support equipment for tree clearing operations. Actual pipeline construction is progressing across Ohio toward a collecting station near Defiance. That segment of the project is expected to wrap up in July. The 42-inch line through Michigan and into Ontario is scheduled for completion in November. The line is projected to transport 3.25 billion cubic feet of natural gas every day.
  • Front.geese
    ON THE MOVE—Six goslings head out on manuevers with their parents in an area lake. Baby waterfowl are showing up in lakes and ponds throughout the area.
  • Accident
    FAYETTE resident Patricia Stambaugh, 64, was declared dead on the scene of a single-vehicle accident Friday morning south of Morenci. Rescue units were called around 9 a.m., but as of Tuesday, law enforcement officers had not yet determined the time of the accident. According to Ohio State Highway Patrol, Stambaugh was driving west on U.S. 20 when her Chevrolet Malibu traveled off the north side of the road and down a steep embankment, coming to rest in Bean Creek (Tiffin River).
  • Front.teacher Leading
    PRESCHOOL MUSIC—Fayette band director Jeffrey Dunford spends the last half hour of the day leading the full-day preschool class in musical activities. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.poles
    MOVING EAST—Utility workers continue their slow progress east along U.S. 20 south of Morenci. New electrical poles are put in place before wiring is moved into place.
  • Face Paint
    FUN NIGHT FUN—Savanna Miles sits patiently while Abbie White works on a face paint design Friday during the Morenci PTO Fun Night. Gracie Snead watches the progress after having spent time in the chair. Abbie was one of several volunteer painters, each creating their own unique look. Additional photos are on the back page of this week’s Observer.

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