The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Front.cheers
    MACEE BEERS joins other Fayette Elementary School students for the annual Mini-Cheer performance during the half-time break at the basketball game.
  • Family.3.wide
    CHILDREN at Stair District Library’s Family Story Time toss scarves into the air during an activity. The evening program provided a mix of stories, songs, dancing, crafts and snacks Monday evening. The program is offered at 5:30 p.m. every Monday for five more weeks. The program is designed for three to five year olds and their family.
  • Front.newpaper.2
    THE INTERVIEW—Evelyn Joughin (right) records the interaction with an iPad while Jack Varga, next to her, asks questions of Morenci Elementary School principal Gail Frey. Morenci senior Sam Cool (standing) listens. Cool serves as the editor for the newspaper written by members of Mrs. Barrett’s second grade class.
  • Front.code.2
    WRITING CODE—Brock Christle (left), a Morenci fifth grade student, takes a look at the progress being made by fourth grader Anthony Lewis. Libby Rorick, a sixth grade student, is next in a line of girls trying out the coding tutorials. This year marked Morenci’s second year of participation in the Hour of Code project.
  • Front.gym.new
    REMIE RYAN (left) tries to dodge the foam wand held by Hayden Bays during physical education class at Morenci Elementary School. In the background, Lauryn Dominique and Brooklyn Williams stay clear of the tag. Second grade students were working on cardiovascular health on the first day back from vacation. For the record, Safety Tag is a very difficult sport to photograph.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.library.books
    MACK DICKSON takes a book off the “blind date” cart at the Fayette library. Patrons can choose a book without knowing what’s inside other than a general category. The books are among those designated for removal so patrons can consider them gifts. In Morenci, new books and staff favorites were chosen from the stacks and must be returned. Patrons get a piece of chocolate, too, to take on their date, but no clue about their “date.” One reader said she really enjoyed her book for a few pages, but then lost interest—so typical for a blind date.

Fayette village council 2012.08.22

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

Fayette council members have begun discussion about a campaign to help win voters’ support for the replacement of two levies in November.

The 2.9 mill general fund levy and the 2.0 mill park levy have both been renewed by voters over the years—the general fund levy since 1968—but this time residents will be asked to replace the levies and bring the value of property to current levels.

Village administrator Steve Blue said at the Aug. 8 committee of the whole meeting that council should schedule public meetings to discuss the ballot request and include information with water bills.

Councilor Dave Wheeler added that flyers could be left at businesses, the library and the post office. Mayor Ruth Marlatt suggested presenting a new facet of the millage request every month leading up to the vote to remind residents of the benefits that will follow.

The idea for the replacement effort stemmed from a grant the village received for street paving. The money would cover street repairs for all streets not involved in the sewer project.

The $400,000 grant requires an annual loan payment of $20,400—a sum the village doesn’t have available. Council members don’t want to let the grant offer slip away so they will try to gain the support of taxpayers.

Blue will provide detailed information about the replacement levy cost to taxpayers.

OVERDUE—Blue told councilors that police offers delivered about 40 water shut-off notices to customers who are overdue on their payments. Several of them paid after the notices were given.

VFO Lisa Zuver said that none of the overdue bills were under $200.

HYDRANTS—Maintenance supervisor Tom Clemenson said his workers are putting Band-Aids on Band-Aids in repairing the village’s aging water system.

The 600-foot section of N. Ohio Street has nine holes from past repairs due to water line breaks. Some holes have been opened multiple times.

RECYCLING—Council is still seeking a group interested in volunteering at the recycling center. Dave Lichtenwald will give up his work there in about a year and he needs assistance now to help keep the center in operation.

The sale of recycled materials brings in about $175 per quarter and this could go to a group taking responsibility for overseeing the center.

TREES—When the current round of tree cutting is completed, Blue said, that will take care of the entire town, based on the recommendations of the village tree commission. After that, he said, cutting will be residents’ responsibility as listed in the village ordinance book.

Wheeler stated that trees shouldn’t be allowed beyond sidewalks.

A tree-trimming project was expected to begin soon to clean overhead branches to a minimum height of 20 feet.

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