Fayette village council 2012.08.01

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

Frustration with spending by Fayette’s park board was discussed by council members at the July 25 meeting.

Questions were asked about whether fees charged for summer ball participation are covering costs, and whether fund-raising efforts by the park board are sufficient.

Village administrator Steve Blue said he spoke with park director Nick Ramos and told him that the board needed to cut back.

“Cut back?” asked councilor Julia Ruger.

With $42,000 spent, she suggested that it was a little late to be cutting back.

Village fiscal officer Lisa Zuver said she can almost guarantee the board will not bring in enough revenue this year to cover expenses.

Zuver wondered if the director only reports to park board or if council approval is needed. She suggested that maybe the board has too much authority.

Village solicitor Tom Thompson said the park budget should be established by council and the decision about how to spend the money is up to the board.

Zuver wondered how closely the board looks at the budget and who it reports to.

Mayor Ruth Marlatt asked Zuver to prepare a report on where the park board budget currently stands. Board members can examine the document at their next meeting.

“They need to realize that we’re not just saying there’s no money,” Marlatt said. “They knew when they were making those expenditures that things were tight. We need to make them aware of the fact that they’ve gone beyond ‘tight’.”

Zuver encouraged council members to look through the finance report and see where money was spent to have their questions answered.

“They need to know we’re concerned,” Marlatt said.

TAX—Blue noted in his report that income tax collections are more than $60,000 behind last year’s amount at this time of the year, although the second quarter report is not yet complete.

Similarly, utility collections are running $13,000 behind for the second quarter. Delinquent payments to the village total $43,700 or 18 percent of billings. That number is far too high, Blue said, and he aims to make a stronger effort to collect.

“After talking with Lisa [Zuver],” he said, “it’s apparent our collection efforts are not sufficient.”

GRANT—Blue said that council should learn before Oct. 25 whether or not the village will receive a $600,000 grant to contribute to the sewer project. When the outcome is known, bids can be sought.

METERS—The grant for water meter replacement is for $22,000 and requires $3,000 from the village. Many questions remain about the grant, such as whether the village can buy new meters and install them as needed rather than tackle the entire village at once, which would cost more than $200,000. 

The village has a large inventory of old meters and Blue will find out whether they can still be used, despite containing some pieces with lead. Only lead-free meters will be available in the future.

EMERGENCY—Council appointed police chief Jason Simon as its representative to a county-wide emergency management board meeting to discuss various issues such as new radios. The board was established when the county began using the 911 emergency system, but it’s been inactive.

CAR WASH—Eagle Car Wash is back in operation, but Blue said he denied a request for the owners to dig their own well but still use the village sewer system.

Council’s Public Works committee recommended denying the request.

AUDIT—The semiannual village audit turned up five findings that Blue described as minor. Zuver made corrections to satisfy the auditors.

TREE CUTTING—Only Knisel offered a bid for Phase 5 of the tree removal plan. The bid was for $3,200, but the Finance committee wants to review the trees scheduled for cutting before make a recommendation to council. The cutting might be delayed for a year.

RANGE—The Public Safety committee discussed public use of the shooting range and suggested that no further action is needed.

PAY—Effective July 23, maintenance supervisor Tom Clemensen’s pay rate is $14.45 an hour.

  • Front.tug
    MORENCI pep rallies generally end with a tug of war. The senior class entry, shown above, did not advance to the finals. Griffin Grieder, Alaina Webster, Kyle Long and Jazmin Smith are shown at the front of the rope, giving it their best effort.
  • Accident
    FAYETTE resident Patricia Stambaugh, 64, was declared dead on the scene of a single-vehicle accident Friday morning south of Morenci. Rescue units were called around 9 a.m., but as of Tuesday, law enforcement officers had not yet determined the time of the accident. According to Ohio State Highway Patrol, Stambaugh was driving west on U.S. 20 when her Chevrolet Malibu traveled off the north side of the road and down a steep embankment, coming to rest in Bean Creek (Tiffin River).
  • Athletic Fields
    SPORTS COMPLEX—Fayette’s outdoor athletic facilities will include three ball fields for summer recreation leagues at the southwest corner of the school. The baseball and softball fields, along with the running track, will be constructed on the east side of the school. Outdoor athletic fields were not part of the new school project from 2007, but voters approved a $1.4 million levy for a school addition and the sports fields last August. Both projects are scheduled to be complete by July 20.
  • Front.teacher Leading
    PRESCHOOL MUSIC—Fayette band director Jeffrey Dunford spends the last half hour of the day leading the full-day preschool class in musical activities. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.F.band
    TROMBONISTS Jake Myers (left) and Max Baker perform Friday at the annual Senior Citizens Luncheon at Fayette High School. The National Honor Society and the FFA chapter teamed up to serve a meal to area seniors and to provide musical entertainment. Both the school band and choir performed. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Station.2
    STRANGE STUFF—Morenci Elementary School students learn that blue isn’t really blue when seen through the right color of lens. Volunteer April Pike presents the lesson to students at one of the many stations brought to the school by the COSI science center. The theme of this year’s visit was the solar system.
  • Front.poles
    MOVING EAST—Utility workers continue their slow progress east along U.S. 20 south of Morenci. New electrical poles are put in place before wiring is moved into place.

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