The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Front.cheers
    MACEE BEERS joins other Fayette Elementary School students for the annual Mini-Cheer performance during the half-time break at the basketball game.
  • Family.3.wide
    CHILDREN at Stair District Library’s Family Story Time toss scarves into the air during an activity. The evening program provided a mix of stories, songs, dancing, crafts and snacks Monday evening. The program is offered at 5:30 p.m. every Monday for five more weeks. The program is designed for three to five year olds and their family.
  • Front.newpaper.2
    THE INTERVIEW—Evelyn Joughin (right) records the interaction with an iPad while Jack Varga, next to her, asks questions of Morenci Elementary School principal Gail Frey. Morenci senior Sam Cool (standing) listens. Cool serves as the editor for the newspaper written by members of Mrs. Barrett’s second grade class.
  • Front.code.2
    WRITING CODE—Brock Christle (left), a Morenci fifth grade student, takes a look at the progress being made by fourth grader Anthony Lewis. Libby Rorick, a sixth grade student, is next in a line of girls trying out the coding tutorials. This year marked Morenci’s second year of participation in the Hour of Code project.
  • Front.skelton.vigil
    MORENCI’S three Skelton brothers were remembered with both tears and laughter last week during a candlelight vigil at Wakefield Park. Several people came out of the crowd to give their recollection of the boys who have now been missing for five years.
  • Front.gym.new
    REMIE RYAN (left) tries to dodge the foam wand held by Hayden Bays during physical education class at Morenci Elementary School. In the background, Lauryn Dominique and Brooklyn Williams stay clear of the tag. Second grade students were working on cardiovascular health on the first day back from vacation. For the record, Safety Tag is a very difficult sport to photograph.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.

Tiffin River part of water quality study 2012.06.20

Written by David Green.

The lower portion of the Tiffin River (Bean Creek) is included in a study conducted by the Ohio EPA this summer to examine water quality of the Maumee River.

A major water quality study of the Maumee River mainstem—the primary downstream segment of a river—will include the two tributaries, the Tiffin and Auglaize rivers. The land draining to the Maumee River is one of the largest watersheds in Ohio, spanning 4,820 square miles and covering all or parts of 20 counties in northwest Ohio.

The study will focus on the full length of the Maumee River, from the Indiana state line to Lake Erie. The field work is the first step in a federally required study called a Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL). A TMDL is the maximum amount of pollutants a water body can receive on a daily basis without violating water quality standards.

Ohio EPA staff will collect water samples and fish and macroinvertebrate species from June through mid-October. The physical, biological and chemical data will help determine water quality problems in the rivers and develop options for improving resource quality in degraded areas.

The Tiffin River will be studied from its mouth at the Maumee north to Brush Creek near Evansport. From previous studies, the Tiffin River watershed shows adverse impacts from channelization and other hydromodification changes; a lack of woody areas along streams; a lack of stable woody debris left in the stream channel; lethally low dissolved oxygen concentrations at night from biochemical decay; nutrient enrichment agricultural runoff, faulty wastewater treatment plants, urban stormwater and runoff fertilizer; and sedimentation from runoff.

The largest cities on the Maumee River are Defiance, Napoleon, Perrysburg, Maumee and Toledo. The majority of the watershed is cultivated crop land. Approximately 11.5 percent of the land is urban development and several communities withdraw drinking water from the Maumee River, including Bowling Green, McClure, Napoleon and Defiance.

Ohio EPA will share results of the study with communities in the watershed. The Agency relies on community input to develop watershed improvement plans. A number of public meetings will be scheduled during the watershed plan-writing process.

Ohio EPA employees carry a photo ID and will request permission from private landowners if access to their property is needed.

 For more information, contact Ohio EPA’s Public Interest Center at 614/644-2160 or go to http://www.epa.ohio.gov/dsw/tmdl/monitoring_MaumeeRiver.aspx.

Weekly newspaper serving SE Michigan and NW Ohio - State Line Observer ©2006-2016