The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Front.cheers
    MACEE BEERS joins other Fayette Elementary School students for the annual Mini-Cheer performance during the half-time break at the basketball game.
  • Family.3.wide
    CHILDREN at Stair District Library’s Family Story Time toss scarves into the air during an activity. The evening program provided a mix of stories, songs, dancing, crafts and snacks Monday evening. The program is offered at 5:30 p.m. every Monday for five more weeks. The program is designed for three to five year olds and their family.
  • Front.newpaper.2
    THE INTERVIEW—Evelyn Joughin (right) records the interaction with an iPad while Jack Varga, next to her, asks questions of Morenci Elementary School principal Gail Frey. Morenci senior Sam Cool (standing) listens. Cool serves as the editor for the newspaper written by members of Mrs. Barrett’s second grade class.
  • Front.code.2
    WRITING CODE—Brock Christle (left), a Morenci fifth grade student, takes a look at the progress being made by fourth grader Anthony Lewis. Libby Rorick, a sixth grade student, is next in a line of girls trying out the coding tutorials. This year marked Morenci’s second year of participation in the Hour of Code project.
  • Front.gym.new
    REMIE RYAN (left) tries to dodge the foam wand held by Hayden Bays during physical education class at Morenci Elementary School. In the background, Lauryn Dominique and Brooklyn Williams stay clear of the tag. Second grade students were working on cardiovascular health on the first day back from vacation. For the record, Safety Tag is a very difficult sport to photograph.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.library.books
    MACK DICKSON takes a book off the “blind date” cart at the Fayette library. Patrons can choose a book without knowing what’s inside other than a general category. The books are among those designated for removal so patrons can consider them gifts. In Morenci, new books and staff favorites were chosen from the stacks and must be returned. Patrons get a piece of chocolate, too, to take on their date, but no clue about their “date.” One reader said she really enjoyed her book for a few pages, but then lost interest—so typical for a blind date.

Fayette recycling center in for a change 2012.05.30

Written by David Green.

Changes are ahead for Fayette’s recycling center because the two volunteers handling the bulk of the operations won’t be in the position to operate it in the future.

“In the next few years you’re going to have to make a decision on what you want to do with it,” Dave Metcalf told village council members last week.

Metcalf attended the May 23 council meeting to let council members know that a change in the operation of the facility will be needed sometime down the road.

Metcalf said he won’t be available in the winters and Dave Lichtenwald will be in a similar position in a couple of years.

Metcalf noted that Morenci pays a coordinator to work a few hours every week and that the centers in several other communities are operated by groups or an individual that receive the profits from the sale of the recycled goods. Archbold, Wauseon, Delta and Swanton all have curbside pick-up.

Fayette is the only center that’s run only by volunteers, he said, and he and Lichtenwald believe it’s a necessary arrangement in order to keep recycling going.

Metcalf said that park board members initially operated the center on Saturdays, but there’s no longer any participation by park board members. Funds from the sales of materials still go to the park board, as originally planned. The sale of recyclable materials brings in about $175 every quarter.

Cub Scouts, National Honor Society members and the school ag department all help out.

Council member Julia Ruger said her family was late in discovering the benefits of recycling, but they’re now strong supporters. She says it cuts in half the amount of trash they place at the curb.

She was surprised to learn that recycling funds went to the park board. She believes the board’s involvement is needed if they are the ones benefitting. Otherwise, another organization should be found to help out.

Mayor Ruth Marlatt said she knows the issue has been brought up to the board in the past and efforts to schedule workers never panned out.

Metcalf said he and Lichtenwald spend about an hour every day at the center to clean up. There are occasional problems to address, such as trash dropped off at the center, but last week there was a situation that had never before occurred.

Four or five dozen syringes were left in the drop-off area. They were taken to a doctor’s office for disposal and learned the syringes had been used for agricultural purposes. There was also shattered glass.

Metcalf said No. 5 plastic is taken to Toledo by someone, that Styrofoam is taken to Morenci, and rechargeable batteries are taken to Lowe’s.

Marlatt said she often sees cardboard and other recyclable materials at the curb for pick-up.

“I know you invest a lot of time in it,” Marlatt told Metcalf. “You are appreciated.”

She repeated the thanks to Lichtenwald when he arrived at the meeting later, adding, “We really need to work on this. We can’t just let it die.”

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