The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
  • Front.winner
    REFEREE Camden Miller raises the hand of Morenci Jr. Dawgs wrestler Ryder Ryan as his opponent leaves the mat in disappointment. Morenci’s youth wrestling program served as host for a tournament Saturday morning to raise money for the club. Additional photos are on the back page.
  • Front.bank.2
    SHERWOOD STATE Bank opened its Fayette office at a grand opening Friday morning, drawing a large crowd to view the renovated building. Above, Burt Blue talks to teller Cindy Funk, while his wife, Jackie, looks around the new office. The Blues missed the opening and took a quick tour on Tuesday. Few traces remain of the former grocery store and theater, however, part of the original brick wall still shows in the hallway leading to the back of the building. The drive-through window should be ready for customers later in the month.
  • Front.carry.casket
    CARRYING—Riley Terry (blue jacket) and Mason Vaughn lead the way, carrying an empty casket outside to the hearse waiting at the curb. Morenci juniors and seniors visited Eagle Funeral Home last week to learn about the role of a funeral director and to understand the process of arranging for a funeral.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.make.three
    FROM THE LEFT, Landon Wilkins, Ryan White and Logan Blaker try out their artistic skills Saturday afternoon at the Morenci PTO’s first Date to Create event. More than 50 people showed up to create decorated planks of wood to hang from rope. The event served as a fund-raiser for miscellaneous PTO projects. Additional photos are on the back of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.F.office
    NEW OFFICES—Fayette village administrator Steve Blue speaks with tax administrator Genna Biddix at the new front desk of the village office. Village council members voted to use budgeted renovation funds targeted for the old office and instead buy the vacant bank building on the corner of Main and Fayette streets. The old office was sold to Sherwood State Bank. When everything is put into place in the spacious new village office, an open house will be scheduled. Council member David Wheeler donated all of his time needed to make changes in the bank interior to fit the Village’s needs.

Fayette school board 2012.03.21

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

The Fayette school district is about to drop a grade on the state’s rating list, but it won’t be alone. Nearly every school in the state is expected to move downward as state education officials toughen the standards.

Gov. John Kasich’s new accountability proposal is waiting for final approval from federal officials through the No Child Left Behind program, but the effect of the changes is already known.

Fayette’s current “excellent” rating drops to a B grade with the new standards. That’s the same for every other district in the county that has the top rating. Schools will now be rated on letter grades from A to F. 

Secondary principal Dan Feasel told board of education members Monday night that 72 percent of the state’s public schools were rated “proficient” or higher, but most of them will now go to a “B” grade.

“You get to the next hoop and you conquer it, then they’ll find a way to change it,” he said.

Gov. Kasich was pushing hard for charter schools when he came into office, Feasel said, but only 22 percent of those school reached proficiency and many will receive Fs.

“He might be pushing in the wrong direction,” Feasel said.

When too many districts achieve proficiency, it must be considered too easy, said superintendent Russ Griggs. The schools are dropped down and they can climb back up again.

State education officials believe the current system really is too easy. State superintendent Stan Heffner told reporters that instead of preparing students for college, schools are asked to help students meet minimum standards of proficiency and promoting mediocrity.

Despite a large number of “excellent” ratings, state officials say that 40 percent of Ohio high school graduates needed remedial help in math and English at college.

The current system lets kids down, Heffner said.

In addition to the new letter grade system, district will need to make a move toward implementing Common Core Standards throughout the grades.

Examples given of a more rigorous curriculum include a requirement for writing more argument-based and opinion pieces rather than summary reports. Students will need to discuss what they’ve learned and support their ideas. More complex mathematics concepts will be introduced at a younger age.

Another change on the horizon comes in the testing program because the existing tests are seen as incapable of measuring the new standards.

Although the tests have not yet been created, it’s known they will be taken via a computer, with results returned within a week or two.

Fayette elementary school principal Dr. Luann Boyer told the board about another coming change that could prove controversial. Any third grade student that isn’t reading at grade level by the end of the year will be retained.

That would come at the end of intensive intervention. Any student in kindergarten through second grade that is performing below grade level must have his or her individual intervention plan with detailed monitoring of progress.

After two years or more of intervention, a student would automatically be held back if not performing at grade level.

The governor is also pushing for a plan that would allow outsiders to evaluate teachers and put in place a means of terminating low-performing teachers who haven’t responded sufficiently from professional development help.

SIGNS—Griggs said that financial assistance might come ODOT to help with the erection of directional signs on the two state highways near the school.

TRIPS—The board approved two FFA trips: a trip to Camp Muskingum in Carrollton, Ohio, June 25-29, traveling by bus with the Delta FFA organization and one to attend Washington Leadership Conferences in Washington, D.C., traveling by airplane and public transportation with Wauseon FFA Advisor.

COACHES—The following coaches were approved: Adam Ohlemacher and David Conklin, assistant junior high track; Alissa Stockburger, assistant volleyball; Danni Keefer, volleyball; Sarah Bird, JV girls basketball; Tim Nicely, varsity girls basketball; Matt Maginn, JV boys basketball.

STAFF—Family leave was approved for Beth Schaffner from April 16 to May 29.

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