Fayette council 2012.02.22

Written by David Green.

Fayette might be better served by purchasing its own water leak detector rather than pay a company to do the work.

Maintenance supervisor/interim administrator Tom Clemensen suggested that council consider buying its own leak detector as an alternative to hiring Aqua-Line to track down water line leaks.

At the committee of the whole meeting Feb. 8, councilor Rodney Kessler explained the issue in Clemensen’s absence, stating that any visit from Aqua-Line costs a minimum of $518. The village could buy its own unit for $1,274 and possibly reimburse some of the cost by contracting its use to other communities.

The recent leak on Main Street produced no water on the surface and instead leaked directly into a sewer line. Clemensen suspects that another large leak exists.

The device operates by “listening” for the sound of water flowing.

Other items in Clemensen’s report included his efforts to create an updated standard operating procedure for the wastewater system; purchasing safety equipment for the village crew; and an update on a street collapse issue at Main and Lawrence that might become a recurring problem.

Clemensen also mentioned a problem at the sewage lift station near the south end of the trailer park. Pumps are not operating at their full capacity. However, he said, it’s not an issue that would lead to an overflow.

Clemensen explored the possibility of using calcium chloride additive to road salt, but learned it’s not cost effective for the limited amount that Fayette would use. As of Feb. 8, snow removal and salt application was needed only two times this season.

A new box for the one-ton dump truck was ordered and the Public Works committee will review a bid for a new chipper that would cost $18,250 plus $2,000 freight from California.

Clemensen gave an update Feb. 20 at the Public Works committee meeting. He’s recommending a box from Dan’s Truck Repair   of Perrysburg at a cost of $4,995 which is $5 under budget. Most other units cost at least $7,000, he said. Dan’s will install the new box if the old one is first removed.

Clemensen said the brush chipper is a 2004 model that was used by a municipality. The four-cylinder engine enables the unit to handle limbs up to nine inches in circumference—the maximum allowed for placement at the curb by village ordinance.

Clemensen said it’s the best deal he’s found for the low number of hours used. In addition, the unit has a well-known American motor that will be good for servicing needs.

GEOTHERMAL—TRW is seeking a zoning variance to install 10 wells for a geothermal heating system. The wells would be located on the north side of the building and would not be visible once they are installed.

AFFAIRS BOARD—Marlatt told council members she has information for them to read about the operation of a board of public affairs. She suggested that council consider forming a board instead of hiring an administrator.

She made the suggestion because of the village’s financial situation.

  • Front.nok Hok
    GAMES DAY—Finn Molitierno (right) celebrates a goal during a game of Nok Hockey with his sister, Kyla. The two tried out a variety of games Saturday at Stair District Library’s annual International Games Day event. One of the activities featured a sort of scavenger hunt in which participants had to locate facts presented in the Smithsonian Hometown Teams exhibit. The traveling show left Morenci’s library Tuesday, wrapping up a series of programs that began Oct. 2. Additional photos are on page 7.
  • Station.2
    STRANGE STUFF—Morenci Elementary School students learn that blue isn’t really blue when seen through the right color of lens. Volunteer April Pike presents the lesson to students at one of the many stations brought to the school by the COSI science center. The theme of this year’s visit was the solar system.
  • Front.leaves
    MAPLE leaves show their fall colors in a puddle at Morenci’s Riverside Natural Area. “This was a great year for colors,” said local weather watcher George Isobar. Chilly mornings will give way to seasonable fall temperatures for the next two weeks.
  • Front.band
    MORENCI Marching Band member Brittany Dennis keeps the beat Friday during the half-time show of the Morenci/Pittsford football game. Color guard member Jordan Cordts is at the left. The band performed this season under the direction of Doyle Rodenbeck who served as Morenci’s band director in the 1970s. He’s serving as a substitute during a family leave.
  • Front.poles
    MOVING EAST—Utility workers continue their slow progress east along U.S. 20 south of Morenci. New electrical poles are put in place before wiring is moved into place.
  • Front.cowboy
    A PERFORMER named Biligbaatar, a member of the AnDa Union troupe from Inner Mongolia, dances at Stair District Library last week during a visit to the Midwest. The nine-member group blends a variety of traditions from Inner and Outer Mongolia. The music is described as drawing from “all the Mongol tribes that Genghis Khan unified.” The group considers itself music gatherers whose goal is to preserve traditional sounds of Mongolia. Biligbaatar grew up among traditional herders who live in yurts. Additional photos are on the back page of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.bear
    HOLDEN HUTCHISON gives a hug to a black bear cub—the product of a taxidermist’s skills—at the Michigan DNR’s Great Youth Jamboree. The event on Sunday marked the fourth year of the Jamboree. Additional photos are on page 12.

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