The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Snow.2
    FIRST SNOW—Heavy, wet flakes piled deep on tree branches—and windshields—as the area received its first significant snowfall of the season. “Usually it begins with a dusting or two,” said George Isobar, Morenci’s observer for the National Weather Service, “but this time it came with a vengeance.” By the end of the day Saturday, a little over four inches of snow was on the ground. Now comes the thaw with temperatures in the 40s and 50s for three days.
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    SKEWERS, gumdrops, and marshmallows are all that’s needed to create interesting shapes and designs for Layla McDowell Saturday at Stair District Library’s “Sculptamania!” Open House. The program featuring design games and materials is one part of a larger project funded by a $7,500 Curiosity Creates grant from Disney and the American Library Association. Additional photos are on page 7.
    Morenci marching band members took to the field Friday night dressed for Halloween during the Bulldog’s first playoff game. Morenci fans had a bit of a scare until the fourth quarter when the Bulldogs scored 30 points to leave Lenawee Christian School behind. Whiteford visits Morenci this Friday for the district championship game. From the left is Clayton Borton, Morgan Merillat and James O’Brien.
    DNA PUZZLE—Mitchell Storrs and Wyatt Mohr tackle a puzzle representing the structure of DNA. There’s only one correct way for all the pieces to fit. It’s one of the new materials that can be used in both biology and chemistry classes, said teacher Loretta Cox.
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    A TRAFFIC control worker stands in the middle of Morenci’s Main Street Tuesday morning, waiting for the next flow of vehicles to be let through from the west. The dusty gravel surface was sealed with a layer of tar, leaving only the application of paint for new striping. The project was completed in conjunction with county road commission work west of Morenci.
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    JUNIORS Jazmin Smith and Trevor Corkle struggle against a team from the sophomore class Friday during the annual tug of war at the Homecoming Games pep rally. Even the seniors struggled against the sophomores who won the competition. At the main course of the day, the Bulldog football team struggled against Whiteford in a homecoming loss.
    YOUNG soccer players surived a chilly morning Saturday in Morenci’s PTO league. From the left is Emma Cordts, Wayne Corser, Carter and Levi Seitz, Briella York and Drew Joughin. Two more weeks of soccer remain for this season.
  • Front.ropes
    BOWEN BAUMGARTNER of Morenci makes his way across a rope bridge constructed by the Tecumseh Boy Scout troop Sunday at Lake Hudson Recreation Area. The bridge was one of many challenges, displays and games set up for the annual Youth Jamboree by the Michigan DNR. Additional photos on are the back page of this week’s Observer.
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    One of four senior candidates will be crowned the fall homecoming queen during half-time of this week’s Morenci-Whiteford football game. In the back row (left to right) is exchange student Kinga Vidor (her escort will be Caylob Alcock), seniors Alli VanBrandt (escorted by Sam Cool), Larissa Elliott (escorted by Clayton Borton), Samantha Wright (escorted by JJ Elarton) and Justis McCowan (escorted by Austin Gilson), and exchange student Rebecca Rosenberger (escorted by Garrett Smith). Front row freshman court member Allie Kaiser (escorted by Anthony Thomas), sophomore Marlee Blaker (escorted by Nate Elarton) and junior Cheyenne Stone (escorted by Dominick Sell).
  • Front.park.lights
    GETTING READY—Jerad Gleckler pounds nails to secure a string of holiday lights on the side of the Wakefield Park concession stand while other members of the Volunteer Club and others hold them in place. The volunteers showed up Sunday afternoon to string lights at the park. The decorating project will continue this Sunday. Denise Walsh is in charge of the effort this year.
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Rex Riley Scholarship winners from 10 years ago 2012.02.01

Written by David Green.

The Morenci Kiwanis Club’s annual Soup and Pie Supper is scheduled next Wednesday as club members serve the public at the Eagles to earn money for college scholarships.

A week before the event, the Observer takes a look at winners of the Rex Riley Scholarship from 10 years ago to see what they’ve experienced since leaving Morenci Area High School.

Despite tough economic times, graduates are finding their way through to interesting experiences and goals.

Alex Pummel: Alex Pummel took his Rex Riley scholarship to Cedarville (Ohio) University where he earned a degree in exercise physiology and played baseball for four years.

He also met his wife, Amanda, while in school and they’re now new parents.

Some time after college the Pummels went on a four and a half month mission project in Togo, West Africa. Alex had no medical training, but he assisted physicians and physician assistants (PA).

“It was a great experience and we’re both open to future mission work,” Alex said.

That experience also gave him an interest in becoming a PA and he’s now enrolled in a 26-month program at Kettering College in Dayton.

Carmen Ely: Carmen Ely went from school to work and she stayed right there.

Carmen earned a degree in accounting from Baker College in Jackson, and for her required internship, she chose Phil Rubley’s CPA office in Morenci.

Her employer must have seen promise in the student because Carmen was hired as soon as she graduated.

Unlike many of her classmates from the class of 2002, Carmen is a home owner where she lives with her dog.

She was never a runner in high school, but since leaving college she’s run several 5K races along with a pair of marathons.

Ashley (Kuebeck) Thompson: Ashley attended the University of Toledo, originally to study pharmacy, but she ended up in the nursing school.

She started working at Mike’s Pharmacy in Morenci and she’s content to stay.

“I just really like what I’m doing,” she said, and besides, she has steady hours and remains close to her family and that’s worth a lot to her.

She and her husband, Travis, are the parents of a three-year-old son, Grady, and a second child is due in May.

Emily Mota: Emily studied at Siena Heights University and works in Adrian. She’s making plans to return to school.

“I’m looking into getting a degree in the nursing field,” she said.

Kay (Dickerson) Holubik: After high school Kay headed to Central Michigan University and majored in biology with a minor in business management.

She was hired by the Ransom and Randolph casting company in Maumee, starting in as a technician but soon developing some of her own products. Kay also had two technical articles published in an industry journal.

She married Jason Holubik in 2010 and their first child, Willow, was born last year.

While Jason teaches with with Camden-Frontier school system, Kay is enjoying life as a stay-at-home mother.

Anthony Roman: Anthony earned a degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Michigan and worked a variety of part-time jobs while in school. That, he said, provided him with a well-rounded practical education along with a greater appreciation of the education he was receiving in school.

Anthony accepted a job with a Japanese company in Ann Arbor that makes bearing components, knowing that he would be sent to Japan for a year. He and his high school girlfriend, Kriston Wilt, were married before going overseas.

He was offered a permanent position with the company, but decided to return to America so Kriston could complete her teaching degree. Anthony is also back in school, studying Japanese in night classes.

“We hope to return for an extended stay in the next couple of years,” he said.

The Romans saw the tourist sites, but it was everyday life that they really enjoyed.

“Being able to experience daily life gave us a deep appreciation of some of the nuances of the culture that we would not have normally found,” Anthony said.

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