Fayette village council 2011.12.21

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

Plans for funding Fayette’s sewer separation project took a turn for the worse since federal dollars are becoming more scarce.

Roberta Acosta of the Rural Community Assistance Program (RCAP) broke the news to council members Dec. 14 at the committee of the whole meeting.

“There are some issues with the funding that have come up,” she said. “There are not much federal dollars coming this year.”

RCAP, a private non-profit agency, has worked with the village for several years in an effort to seek funding for sewer work.

Acosta reminded council of its decision to complete the sewer work in one large project rather than tackling smaller phases, as was done in the past.

The U.S.D.A.  was to fund 45 percent of the project cost, but now, Acosta said, the offer is to give a grant of $1.7 million (28 percent of the cost) and a loan of $2.4 million.

Acosta said she told U.S.D.A. representatives that Fayette’s project would grind to a halt with those arrangements.

She estimates that sewer rates would need to increase by $33 a month to finance the U.S.D.A. proposal.

If council were to forgo the U.S.D.A. money, she said, and instead borrow everything interest-free from the U.S. EPA, rates would bump up by about half that much. Initially, an increase of only $8 a month was expected.

Acosta said she will continue pushing the U.S.D.A. for additional funds.

There are four areas where applicants accumulate points in the competitive funding program and Fayette has the maximum number of points in three areas. Earning more points in the fourth could lead to a grant covering up to 75 percent of the project. Acosta said it’s a long shot to move up in the standings, but it’s worth a try.

Maintenance supervisor Tom Clemensen told council it’s important to document sewer backups—septic sewage, not storm water, and backups related to the main sewer lines and not service lines to homes.

Clemensen said he’s received reports of sewage backing up into basements following heavy rain events.

The predicament for the village, Acosta said, comes through rising construction costs.

“I always tell people, ‘Your project is never going to get cheaper than now,’ ” she said.

An increase in grant funding will likely be partially offset by higher construction costs.

PARKS—The Fayette park board is recommending Nick Ramos to serve as the new park director. A second candidate was also very qualified, Clemensen said, making the board’s decision a tough one. Council will vote on filling the position at the Dec. 28 meeting.

Park board member Jason Ohlemacher said discussion continues with the Fayette United Methodist Church youth group about operating the park concession stand next summer as a fund raiser.

The youth group, or any other interested organization, would pay for utilities—estimated at $100 a month—and the village would only handle any maintenance needs that might arise.

ZONING—Dave Wheeler announced his resignation from the village zoning board since he will join village council in January.

  • Cecil
    THE MAYOR—Cecil Schoonover poses with a collection of garden gnomes that mysteriously arrive and disappear from his property. Along with the gnomes, someone created the sign stating that he is the Mayor of Gnomesville. He hasn’t yet tracked down the people involved in the prank, but he’s having a good time with the mystery.
  • Front.rest
    TAKE A BREAK—Last Wednesday’s session of Stair District Library’s Summer Reading Program ended with a quiet period in a class presented by yoga instructor Melany Gladieux of Toledo. Children learned a variety of yoga poses in the main room at the library, then finished off the session relaxing. Additional photos are on page 7. Area children are invited to visit the library today when the Michigan Science Center presents a flight program at 11 a.m. and roller coasters at 1 p.m.
  • Front.batter
    THE DERBY—Tyler “Smallpox” Flakne of Minnesota’s Home Run League All-Stars goes for the fence Friday night during the National Wiffle League Association’s home run derby in Morenci. This year the wiffleball national tournament moved from Dublin, Ohio, to Morenci’s Wakefield Park. During the derby, competitors had two minutes to hit as many home runs as possible. The winner this year finished with 21. See page 6 and 7 for additional photos.
  • Front.green Screen
    OUT OF THIS WORLD—Elizabeth McFadden and Elise Christle pose in front of the green screen as VolunTeen Noah Gilson makes them appear as though they are standing on the Moon. More photos from the Stair District Library’s NASA @ My Library program are on page 12.
  • Front.snake
    Lannis Smith of the Leslie Science and Nature Center in Ann Arbor shows off a python last week at Stair District Library's Summer Reading Program.
  • Front.fireworks
    FIREWORKS erupt Saturday night over Morenci’s Wakefield Park during the waning hours of the Town and Country Festival. Additional festival photos are inside.
  • Pipeline Spread
    LINED UP—Lengths of pipe were put in place last week along the route of the Rover natural gas pipeline that will stretch from Defiance, Ohio, to Ontario, Canada. Topsoil was removed before the pipes were laid out. The 42-inch diameter pipeline is scheduled for completion in November.
  • Front.rock Study
    ROCKHOUNDS—From the left, Joseph McCullough, Sean Pagett and Jonathan McCullough peer through hand lenses to study rocks. The project is part of Morenci Elementary School’s summer camp that continues into August.

Weekly newspaper serving SE Michigan and NW Ohio - State Line Observer ©2006-2017