The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Front.cheers
    MACEE BEERS joins other Fayette Elementary School students for the annual Mini-Cheer performance during the half-time break at the basketball game.
  • Family.3.wide
    CHILDREN at Stair District Library’s Family Story Time toss scarves into the air during an activity. The evening program provided a mix of stories, songs, dancing, crafts and snacks Monday evening. The program is offered at 5:30 p.m. every Monday for five more weeks. The program is designed for three to five year olds and their family.
  • Front.newpaper.2
    THE INTERVIEW—Evelyn Joughin (right) records the interaction with an iPad while Jack Varga, next to her, asks questions of Morenci Elementary School principal Gail Frey. Morenci senior Sam Cool (standing) listens. Cool serves as the editor for the newspaper written by members of Mrs. Barrett’s second grade class.
  • Front.code.2
    WRITING CODE—Brock Christle (left), a Morenci fifth grade student, takes a look at the progress being made by fourth grader Anthony Lewis. Libby Rorick, a sixth grade student, is next in a line of girls trying out the coding tutorials. This year marked Morenci’s second year of participation in the Hour of Code project.
  • Front.gym.new
    REMIE RYAN (left) tries to dodge the foam wand held by Hayden Bays during physical education class at Morenci Elementary School. In the background, Lauryn Dominique and Brooklyn Williams stay clear of the tag. Second grade students were working on cardiovascular health on the first day back from vacation. For the record, Safety Tag is a very difficult sport to photograph.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.library.books
    MACK DICKSON takes a book off the “blind date” cart at the Fayette library. Patrons can choose a book without knowing what’s inside other than a general category. The books are among those designated for removal so patrons can consider them gifts. In Morenci, new books and staff favorites were chosen from the stacks and must be returned. Patrons get a piece of chocolate, too, to take on their date, but no clue about their “date.” One reader said she really enjoyed her book for a few pages, but then lost interest—so typical for a blind date.

Fayette village council 2011.06.22

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

Gamble Road leading to Fayette’s new school might become a little wider than first proposed.

Street lights in the original plan cost $90,000, said village administrator Amy Metz at a committee meeting June 8, and by eliminating a few of the lights, the road could be expanded to 22 feet in width rather than 20 feet as first proposed.

The new design might reduce lighting from 10 lights to five.

Most of the road expansion will be on the south side, Metz said.

Although construction was delayed, Metz said the project should be completed before the Bull Thistle Festival. One lane of traffic is expected to be maintained during construction.

FULTON—Taylor Excavating is the only firm that submitted a bid on the Northwest Fulton Street sewer project. Several companies expressed interest in the project, Metz said, but she was told that it was considered too small.

The village’s engineering firm examined the Taylor bid and recommends accepting it.

CDBG—Metz told council that only 30 percent of residents responded to an income survey needed for a community development block grant (CDBG). The target response rate was 87 percent, but she will forward the data in hopes that it will be acceptable. The funds are for the West Industrial Parkway project.

LTCPMetz spoke recently with a representative from the U.S.D.A. about possible funding for the village’s long term control plan (LTCP) to eliminate combined septic and storm sewers in the village and to bring Camp Palmer sewage to the village for treatment.

The village could apply for a $7.45 million loan through the Water Pollution Control Loan Fund, but the 30-year loan would require annual payments of $250,000, Metz said, which the village cannot afford.

The Camp Palmer portion of the project would cost an estimated $451,000, but would not be paid by village residents.

The village didn’t make the cut in the last funding cycle for a principal forgiveness loan that would reduce the principal and interest on the money borrowed.

LEAK—Metz checked with various sources about the possibility of a power surge affecting a water meter. The suggestion was made by a resident in regard to an extra high water bill. After her conversations, Metz said that she had to conclude that the water passed through the meter.

She said the most convincing argument is that a family member mentioned the toilet “sticking.”

Metz advised council to arrange a payment plan with the resident to take care of the $921 water bill and $315 sewer bill.

Credit was already given in a past leak and the meter was replaced.

“We’re a utility company and we’re providing a service,” she said. “We need to be running it like a business.”

POLICE—Police chief Jason Simon said that a private security firm at Phantom Fireworks inquired about police officers working for the company when they are not on duty with the village. The first priority would be to the village, he said.

Simon said he would volunteer on his day off June 17 to join an escort of patrol cars that will accompany a 12-foot section of a World Trade Center beam from Swanton to Wauseon.

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