Fayette council 2011.05.18

Written by David Green.


Funding possibilities for sewer work in Fayette are getting lined up and village administrator Amy Metz is seeking a variety of funding options including the United States Department of Agriculture.

She met with U.S.D.A. officials last week and learned the village is first in line for funding at the Findlay office since all other projects from 2010 were funded in 2011. The village will learn about the success of its application in October for the 2012 year, Metz said at a committee meeting Wednesday.

A U.S.D.A. grant would cover 45 percent of the project, with the remainder covered by a loan. She’s looking for additional funding through the Water Pollution Control Fund.

For street repair following the sewer work, Metz is looking at help through the Ohio Public Works Commission. When the design phase of the sewer work is completed this summer, specific needs for street repair will be known and funding can be sought to cover repaving.

The Gamble Road rebuilding project leading to the school is expected to begin in June. The village will pay $75,000 of the $225,000 total cost through a zero percent loan.

A sewer line currently travels behind homes on George, Joan and Lawrence streets, Metz said, and when new lines are installed through the Long Term Control Plan, engineers would like to see the sewer line moved to the front of homes along the right of way. The issue is still in the discussion stage, with design work not yet finished.

New catch basins will probably be installed to alleviate flooding in the area.

CLEAN-UP—Six residents registered for the spring clean-up, down from 30 a year ago.

When the village paid ARS to bring in Dumpsters and allow residents to drop off items for a fee, the service cost the village about $2,000 a year, Metz said. ARS is willing to collect even for one person and anyone can call the company anytime throughout the year to arrange for a collection of trash.

SIDEWALKS—The cost of the remaining sidewalk work not already completed along Main and Fayette streets came in at about $18,000. There is one property on W. Main Street that needs setbacks determined and catch basins located.

The construction contract calls for work to begin in early June.

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT—Defiance College student Katie Borer reported on her work underway to help promote local businesses. She took photographs of businesses with their owners for a marketing campaign to “brand” the village. The photos will be posted on the village website

She will also develop a brochure and on-line tools to provide information about Fayette.

Borer also presented a selection of slogans for the village to promote the quality of life, particularly for a family. The slogan “Small town, big family” was favored by some committee members, along with “More than just a small town, it’s family.”

LEAK—Council is facing another challenge to a water leak problem. Ron Lichtenwald spoke on behalf of E. Main Street resident Larry Wilson, who lives alone at the home.

Water metered for the first quarter of 2011 came out to 109,200 gallons—about 100,000 gallons above average. The bill was for $921.

Lichtenwald said he spoke with a former village worker who wondered if a power surge had affected the meter.

Metz said the water flowing through the meter turns the dial and she hadn’t heard of a possible power surge problem. She did learn, however, there was a problem with the toilet malfunctioning.

Information from a meter company indicates that a leak equivalent to a sixteenth inch hole could result in the loss of 74,000 gallons of water in a quarter, which could explain the high reading.

Mike Maginn said that a plumber should have been called since it’s on private property. Lichtenwald said he’s not certified as a plumber, but he believes he’s qualified due to the number of toilets he takes care of through property he owns.

He also noted that someone is at the house visiting Wilson every day and a large leak would likely have been heard.

The village gave credit for a high bill at the residence in 2009.

Metz said she would have a member of the village crew look at the meter and will investigate the possibility of a power surge affecting it.

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