The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
  • Front.winner
    REFEREE Camden Miller raises the hand of Morenci Jr. Dawgs wrestler Ryder Ryan as his opponent leaves the mat in disappointment. Morenci’s youth wrestling program served as host for a tournament Saturday morning to raise money for the club. Additional photos are on the back page.
  • Front.bank.2
    SHERWOOD STATE Bank opened its Fayette office at a grand opening Friday morning, drawing a large crowd to view the renovated building. Above, Burt Blue talks to teller Cindy Funk, while his wife, Jackie, looks around the new office. The Blues missed the opening and took a quick tour on Tuesday. Few traces remain of the former grocery store and theater, however, part of the original brick wall still shows in the hallway leading to the back of the building. The drive-through window should be ready for customers later in the month.
  • Front.carry.casket
    CARRYING—Riley Terry (blue jacket) and Mason Vaughn lead the way, carrying an empty casket outside to the hearse waiting at the curb. Morenci juniors and seniors visited Eagle Funeral Home last week to learn about the role of a funeral director and to understand the process of arranging for a funeral.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.make.three
    FROM THE LEFT, Landon Wilkins, Ryan White and Logan Blaker try out their artistic skills Saturday afternoon at the Morenci PTO’s first Date to Create event. More than 50 people showed up to create decorated planks of wood to hang from rope. The event served as a fund-raiser for miscellaneous PTO projects. Additional photos are on the back of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.F.office
    NEW OFFICES—Fayette village administrator Steve Blue speaks with tax administrator Genna Biddix at the new front desk of the village office. Village council members voted to use budgeted renovation funds targeted for the old office and instead buy the vacant bank building on the corner of Main and Fayette streets. The old office was sold to Sherwood State Bank. When everything is put into place in the spacious new village office, an open house will be scheduled. Council member David Wheeler donated all of his time needed to make changes in the bank interior to fit the Village’s needs.

Fayette council 2011.05.18

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

Funding possibilities for sewer work in Fayette are getting lined up and village administrator Amy Metz is seeking a variety of funding options including the United States Department of Agriculture.

She met with U.S.D.A. officials last week and learned the village is first in line for funding at the Findlay office since all other projects from 2010 were funded in 2011. The village will learn about the success of its application in October for the 2012 year, Metz said at a committee meeting Wednesday.

A U.S.D.A. grant would cover 45 percent of the project, with the remainder covered by a loan. She’s looking for additional funding through the Water Pollution Control Fund.

For street repair following the sewer work, Metz is looking at help through the Ohio Public Works Commission. When the design phase of the sewer work is completed this summer, specific needs for street repair will be known and funding can be sought to cover repaving.

The Gamble Road rebuilding project leading to the school is expected to begin in June. The village will pay $75,000 of the $225,000 total cost through a zero percent loan.

A sewer line currently travels behind homes on George, Joan and Lawrence streets, Metz said, and when new lines are installed through the Long Term Control Plan, engineers would like to see the sewer line moved to the front of homes along the right of way. The issue is still in the discussion stage, with design work not yet finished.

New catch basins will probably be installed to alleviate flooding in the area.

CLEAN-UP—Six residents registered for the spring clean-up, down from 30 a year ago.

When the village paid ARS to bring in Dumpsters and allow residents to drop off items for a fee, the service cost the village about $2,000 a year, Metz said. ARS is willing to collect even for one person and anyone can call the company anytime throughout the year to arrange for a collection of trash.

SIDEWALKS—The cost of the remaining sidewalk work not already completed along Main and Fayette streets came in at about $18,000. There is one property on W. Main Street that needs setbacks determined and catch basins located.

The construction contract calls for work to begin in early June.

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT—Defiance College student Katie Borer reported on her work underway to help promote local businesses. She took photographs of businesses with their owners for a marketing campaign to “brand” the village. The photos will be posted on the village website

She will also develop a brochure and on-line tools to provide information about Fayette.

Borer also presented a selection of slogans for the village to promote the quality of life, particularly for a family. The slogan “Small town, big family” was favored by some committee members, along with “More than just a small town, it’s family.”

LEAK—Council is facing another challenge to a water leak problem. Ron Lichtenwald spoke on behalf of E. Main Street resident Larry Wilson, who lives alone at the home.

Water metered for the first quarter of 2011 came out to 109,200 gallons—about 100,000 gallons above average. The bill was for $921.

Lichtenwald said he spoke with a former village worker who wondered if a power surge had affected the meter.

Metz said the water flowing through the meter turns the dial and she hadn’t heard of a possible power surge problem. She did learn, however, there was a problem with the toilet malfunctioning.

Information from a meter company indicates that a leak equivalent to a sixteenth inch hole could result in the loss of 74,000 gallons of water in a quarter, which could explain the high reading.

Mike Maginn said that a plumber should have been called since it’s on private property. Lichtenwald said he’s not certified as a plumber, but he believes he’s qualified due to the number of toilets he takes care of through property he owns.

He also noted that someone is at the house visiting Wilson every day and a large leak would likely have been heard.

The village gave credit for a high bill at the residence in 2009.

Metz said she would have a member of the village crew look at the meter and will investigate the possibility of a power surge affecting it.

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