Alcohol compliance check finds three violators 04.13.2011

Written by David Green.

Seventeen of 20 Fulton County businesses passed alcohol compliance checks March 25.

The countywide sweep resulted in 17 instances in which minors were denied the sale of alcohol and only three instances of minors being served alcohol.

In conjunction with Healthy Choices Caring Communities (HC3), local police departments, and the Fulton County Sheriff Department, the Ohio Investigative Unit (OIU) completed a series of alcohol compliance checks of retailers with liquor licenses in Fulton County.

During the compliance checks, a trained informant under the age of 21 attempted to purchase alcohol while an officer waited outside away from view of those inside the store.

The purpose of the checks is to ensure that local retailers with liquor licenses are requiring proper identification and selling alcohol only to those age 21 and older, in compliance with the law.

This round of checks shows the percentage of non-compliance has increased slightly from the 2010 results.

“Our goal is to see 100 percent compliance,” said Sharon Morr, vice-chair of Healthy Choices Caring Communities (HC3). “Any establishment selling to someone underage is concerning.”

The OIU works to make sure that all business owners with a liquor license and their employees are trained on Ohio’s laws regarding alcohol and tobacco sales.

An ASK training class is scheduled from 2 to 5 p.m. Monday in the Administration Building Conference room in Wauseon.  Call 419/337-0915 to register for the free training.

According to the 2010 Fulton County Youth Health Assessment, teens who drink—compared to those who don’t—are four times more likely to have driven with a drinking driver; two times more likely to consider attempting suicide in the past 12 months; 12 times more likely to have smoked marijuana in the past 12 months; and three and one-half times more likely to engage in any type of sexual behavior.

Underage drinking is statistically associated with other risky behavior among teens in our county, Morr said.

“We all need to work together to help teens make healthy choices,” she added.

To become a member of HC3 or to obtain more information, contact Lou Moody, project director, at 419/337-0915.

During this round of checks, the following area retailers were compliant with the laws:

• C & J Carryout, 17980 US 20, Fayette;

• Mel’s Tavern, 106-08 E Main St., Fayette;

• Circle K, 200-204 E. Main St., Fayette;

• Lyons Main Stop, 105 W. Morenci St., Lyons;

• Anchor Bay Carry Out, 12328 County Rd 27, West Unity.

The three businesses issued citations on-site for sale and/or furnishing alcohol to a person under 21 were:

• Nu Arch Lanes, 1010 S. Defiance, Archbold;

• Swanton Sports Center, 610 N. Main St., Swanton;

Stop By Mart, 84-86 Dodge St., Swanton.

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