The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Front.cheers
    MACEE BEERS joins other Fayette Elementary School students for the annual Mini-Cheer performance during the half-time break at the basketball game.
  • Family.3.wide
    CHILDREN at Stair District Library’s Family Story Time toss scarves into the air during an activity. The evening program provided a mix of stories, songs, dancing, crafts and snacks Monday evening. The program is offered at 5:30 p.m. every Monday for five more weeks. The program is designed for three to five year olds and their family.
  • Front.newpaper.2
    THE INTERVIEW—Evelyn Joughin (right) records the interaction with an iPad while Jack Varga, next to her, asks questions of Morenci Elementary School principal Gail Frey. Morenci senior Sam Cool (standing) listens. Cool serves as the editor for the newspaper written by members of Mrs. Barrett’s second grade class.
  • Front.code.2
    WRITING CODE—Brock Christle (left), a Morenci fifth grade student, takes a look at the progress being made by fourth grader Anthony Lewis. Libby Rorick, a sixth grade student, is next in a line of girls trying out the coding tutorials. This year marked Morenci’s second year of participation in the Hour of Code project.
  • Front.gym.new
    REMIE RYAN (left) tries to dodge the foam wand held by Hayden Bays during physical education class at Morenci Elementary School. In the background, Lauryn Dominique and Brooklyn Williams stay clear of the tag. Second grade students were working on cardiovascular health on the first day back from vacation. For the record, Safety Tag is a very difficult sport to photograph.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.library.books
    MACK DICKSON takes a book off the “blind date” cart at the Fayette library. Patrons can choose a book without knowing what’s inside other than a general category. The books are among those designated for removal so patrons can consider them gifts. In Morenci, new books and staff favorites were chosen from the stacks and must be returned. Patrons get a piece of chocolate, too, to take on their date, but no clue about their “date.” One reader said she really enjoyed her book for a few pages, but then lost interest—so typical for a blind date.

Fayette village council 10.06

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

When Fayette’s tax administrator Dee Potter decides to retire, the duties covered by her might be turned over to an outside agency.

The council’s Finance Committee met last month with a representative from the Regional Income Tax Association (RITA) to learn about the organization’s services.

RITA serves as the income tax collection agency for 177 Ohio municipalities through the Regional Council of Governments. Currently, Swanton and Metamora are the only RITA members in Fulton County.

In addition to collecting taxes, RITA offers litigation services, online payment options, a free on-site representative to assist taxpayers during tax season, tax code recommendations and more.

By phasing out the tax administrator job, a rough estimate suggests savings of about $30,000 annually.

Committee member Tommy Molitierno expressed concern about an increase in the workload for existing village hall employees. He suggested that the tax administrator keep a log of daily activities to help the committee decide the feasibility of joining RITA.

Village administrator Amy Metz said six months is the typical lead-in time for a community to begin working with RITA, but a small government such as Fayette could be on-line yet this year.

BILLS—Metz told council at the Sept. 21 meeting that the village is getting very strict on the collection of water payments. She said it isn’t uncommon to find several postcards on a residence warning about a possible service shutoff.

Metz said that alternatives are suggested, including financial assistance, and payment schedules are encouraged. But if scheduled payments aren’t made, water service will be shut off.

Outstanding utility accounts are being assessed on property tax statements.

UNEMPLOYMENT—Metz learned that unemployment in Fulton County dropped from 12.6 percent a year ago to 9.7 percent in August.

In Williams County, the rated dropped from 15.8 percent to 11.8 percent in August. Statewide, only a small decline was posted.

ELECTRICITY—Village project engineer Bob Seigneur compared five potential electrical suppliers, but only two presented offers.

Duke Energy offered power at 6.3 cents a kilowatt hour on a nine-month term. The village’s current supplier, First Energy Solutions, offered rates ranging from 6.7 cents to 8.2 cents on a nine-year term. First Energy offers a six percent discount for residential users and a four percent discount for industrial users on the generation and transmission portion of a customer’s bill.

MEETING—Council voted 4-0, with Molitierno and Mike Maginn absent, to continue committee of the whole meetings at 6 p.m. on the second Monday of the month, through the end of the year. The regular council meeting follows on the third Tuesday of the month, at 7 p.m.

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