The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
  • Front.winner
    REFEREE Camden Miller raises the hand of Morenci Jr. Dawgs wrestler Ryder Ryan as his opponent leaves the mat in disappointment. Morenci’s youth wrestling program served as host for a tournament Saturday morning to raise money for the club. Additional photos are on the back page.
  • Front.bank.2
    SHERWOOD STATE Bank opened its Fayette office at a grand opening Friday morning, drawing a large crowd to view the renovated building. Above, Burt Blue talks to teller Cindy Funk, while his wife, Jackie, looks around the new office. The Blues missed the opening and took a quick tour on Tuesday. Few traces remain of the former grocery store and theater, however, part of the original brick wall still shows in the hallway leading to the back of the building. The drive-through window should be ready for customers later in the month.
  • Front.carry.casket
    CARRYING—Riley Terry (blue jacket) and Mason Vaughn lead the way, carrying an empty casket outside to the hearse waiting at the curb. Morenci juniors and seniors visited Eagle Funeral Home last week to learn about the role of a funeral director and to understand the process of arranging for a funeral.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.make.three
    FROM THE LEFT, Landon Wilkins, Ryan White and Logan Blaker try out their artistic skills Saturday afternoon at the Morenci PTO’s first Date to Create event. More than 50 people showed up to create decorated planks of wood to hang from rope. The event served as a fund-raiser for miscellaneous PTO projects. Additional photos are on the back of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.F.office
    NEW OFFICES—Fayette village administrator Steve Blue speaks with tax administrator Genna Biddix at the new front desk of the village office. Village council members voted to use budgeted renovation funds targeted for the old office and instead buy the vacant bank building on the corner of Main and Fayette streets. The old office was sold to Sherwood State Bank. When everything is put into place in the spacious new village office, an open house will be scheduled. Council member David Wheeler donated all of his time needed to make changes in the bank interior to fit the Village’s needs.

Residents respond to Fayette survey 08.18.2010

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

Fayette residents rank industrial development as the top need of the village, while also recognizing the importance of retail development and completion of the sewer separation project.

Survey forms were mailed to a random sample of residents to collect opinion about village services and needs. Respondents also rated their overall level of satisfaction with living in Fayette.

The survey was conducted over the summer in conjunction with an effort to update Fayette’s Comprehensive plan.

Residents were asked to rank 10 issues by their importance for the village and 63 percent placed new industrial development in the top spot. Seventy-three percent placed it among the top three levels of importance.

Retail development wasn’t the top choice of many residents, but 74 percent placed it among the top four levels. Sewer repair and separation was a top-five choice for 71 percent of respondents. Sidewalk repair and replacement appeared among the top five levels for 49 percent.

Appearing at the lower end of the spectrum were new residential development, expanded recreational opportunities and expanded police protection.

Rehabilitation of the central business district, water line improvement and rehabilitation of existing housing were ranked in the middle of importance to the village.

When residents were asked to rank existing services by their importance, police protection and economic development were ranked number one most often. Combining the top three positions, police protection led with 66 percent, followed by utilities and economic development with 59 percent each, street paving with 55 percent and snow removal with 33 percent.

At the low end of the scale were trees, brush removal, recreational activities and recycling.

In a ranking of the quality of services, recycling led the way with 44 percent rating it as excellent. Police protection, snow removal and water/sewer services each received an “excellent” ranking by 15 percent of the respondents.

Nineteen percent rated snow removal as “good,” 17 percent gave the same rating to police services, 13 percent said water/sewer and recreational activities were “good,” and 11 percent said leaf collection was “good.”

At the other end of the scale, economic development was ranked “poor” by 31 percent and street paving was “poor” by 26 percent.

In a question about overall satisfaction, none indicated they were satisfied with the state of the village and 38 percent said they were dissatisfied. The majority, 62 percent, chose “needs improvement.”

Comments written by respondents covered a range of topics, often with conflicting opinions. One person was pleased with the village as it is; another said village officials should “aggressively seek substantial growth in all types of development and services.

Three people mentioned water as a valuable resource of the community, and two of them cautioned against losing that resource to outside sources in need of water.

Efforts to clean up the village (trash, junk cars) were praised by many citizens, but police officers were advised to do more.

“Properties need to be cleaned up for new people to come into town,” one person wrote.

Two people suggested the police department is too large for a small town and another suggested doing away with it completely and contracting services through the county sheriff’s department.

More than one person mentioned the need for additional industrial development and one stated that village services overall cannot improve without additional revenue obtained by a larger industrial base.

One commenter stated that Fayette does not get adequately recognized by county, state and federal officials.

Another citizen’s advice to village council was to keep in mind that not everyone will be satisfied with council’s decisions.

“Do your best to hit the majority and don’t allow yourselves to be backed into a corner,” he said.

Surveys were mailed to 154 residents and 37 citizens responded. The complete results are available on the village website, www.villageoffayette.com.

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