Doug Adams ends 33-year career in education 07.21.10

Written by David Green.

It took Douglas Adams a few years to find his place in the world, but once he found it, he never left.doug.adams.jpg

The 1970 Morenci Area High School graduate recently wrapped up a 33-year career with the Clio (Mich.) school district.

Adams earned a dual degree in business administration and business education from Eastern Michigan University, working his way through school with a job at K-Mart.

The Canandaigua native worked as a special needs vocational student coordinator in Ann Arbor and later as a reading consultant and tutor with the Genesee Intermediate School District.

In September 1977, he joined the Clio district as a marketing teacher and there he stayed. Adams earned a master’s degree in guidance and counseling in 1980 and began working as the Clio High School counselor. He held that position for 18 years, but changed to assistant principal for the final 12 years of his career.

Along the way he spearheaded a drive to obtain North Central Accreditation for the school district, implemented an annual financial aid workshop for parents and students, and operated the district’s Career Center—even after support staff and funding were eliminated.

Adams volunteered for 17 years as a proctor for the Marketing Club regional competition and he received the Michigan Counseling Association’s Outstanding Service to the Profession Award.

Adams service to students went beyond the classroom. He also become known in athletics.

As Clio’s tennis coach, he chosen the State Coach of the Year for the girls team for both Class A and Class B. His teams amassed 310 dual wins, six Big Nine Conference championships and 14 regional championships.

He was inducted into the Michigan High School Tennis Coaches Hall of Fame in 2000 and volunteered as the summer  doubles league director for 17 years.

Adams’s colleagues credit his ability to “motivate the staff toward a common goal” and mention his unwavering advocacy for students.

Another describes him as unselfish with his time. “He is always the first administrator in the building and the last to leave. I couldn’t begin to calculate the hours he has given to all the extracurricular activities in this district. The saying goes, ‘If it’s for the kids, Mr. Adams will be there.”

Adams told a reporter from the Clio newspaper that he will miss the students and his colleagues, but he’s looking forward to spending more time with family, including his mother, Margery Adams, in Canandaigua.

  • Front.cowboy
    A PERFORMER named Biligbaatar, a member of the AnDa Union troupe from Inner Mongolia, dances at Stair District Library last week during a visit to the Midwest. The nine-member group blends a variety of traditions from Inner and Outer Mongolia. The music is described as drawing from “all the Mongol tribes that Genghis Khan unified.” The group considers itself music gatherers whose goal is to preserve traditional sounds of Mongolia. Biligbaatar grew up among traditional herders who live in yurts. Additional photos are on the back page of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.base Ball
    UMPIRE Thomas Henthorn tosses the bat between team captains Mikayla Price and Chuck Piskoti of Flint’s Lumber City Base Ball Club. Following the 1860 rules, after the bat was grabbed by the captains, captains’ hands advanced to the top of the bat—one hand on top of the other. The captain whose hand ended up on top decided who would bat first. Additional photos of Sunday’s game appear on page 12 of this week’s Observer. The contest was organized in conjunction with Stair District Library’s Hometown Teams exhibit that runs through Nov. 20.
    VALUE OF ATHLETICS—Morenci graduate John Bancroft (center) takes a turn at the microphone during a chat session at the opening of the Hometown Teams exhibit at Stair District Library. Clockwise to his left is John Dillon, Jed Hall, Jim Bauer, Joe Farquhar, George Hollstein, George Vereecke and Mike McDowell. Thomas Henthorn (at the podium) kicked off the conversation. Henthorn, a University of Michigan–Flint professor, will return to Morenci this Sunday to lead a game of vintage base ball at the school softball field.
  • Front.cross
    HUDSON RUNNER Jacob Morgan looks toward the top of the hill with dismay during the tough finish at Harrison Lake State Park. Fayette runner Jacob Garrow focuses on the summit, also, during the Eagle Invitational cross country run Saturday morning. Continuing rain and drizzle made the course even more challenging. Results of the race are in this week’s Observer.
  • Front.bear
    HOLDEN HUTCHISON gives a hug to a black bear cub—the product of a taxidermist’s skills—at the Michigan DNR’s Great Youth Jamboree. The event on Sunday marked the fourth year of the Jamboree. Additional photos are on page 12.
  • Front.crossing
    Crossing over—Jim Heiney was given a U.S. flag to carry by George Vereecke (behind Jim in the hat), turning him into the leader of the parade. Bridge Walk participants cross over Bean Creek while, in the background, members of the Morenci Legion Riders cross the main traffic bridge on East Street South. Additional photos appear on the back page of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.hose Testing
    HOSE safety—The FireCatt hose testing company from Troy put Morenci Fire Department hose to the test Monday morning when Mill Street was closed to traffic. The company also checks nozzles and ladders for wear in an effort to keep fire fighters safe while on calls.

Weekly newspaper serving SE Michigan and NW Ohio - State Line Observer ©2006-2016