Mosquito control 6.30.2010

Written by David Green.

The recent rainfall has lead to ideal conditions for mosquitoes to flourish. There are over 60 different species of mosquitoes in Ohio, but they all have a common life cycle—from egg, to larvae, to pupa to adult. Depending on the species and temperature, the insect can produce a new adult population in less than seven days. Adult mosquitoes can be active for 30 days.

Mosquitoes require standing water to complete the larvae and pupa life cycle stages. Reducing the presence of standing water can be helpful in reducing insect numbers and is a good form of control.

When it is not practical to eliminate standing water, larvicides can be used in the water to control early development.

There are two types of larvicides. An insect growth regulator called methoprene kills the larvae or wriggler stage. A homeowner version of this product is sold under the label of PreStrike.

The second type is a Bti product which is a bacterial product. Homeowner versions of this are sold under the label Mosquito Dunks or Quick Kill. These products are sold in solid forms of either briquettes or granules with the treatment amount based on the size of area treated.

During the day adult mosquitoes will rest in protected areas such as trees, shrubs and other dense vegetation. Removal of this vegetation or treatment with insecticides can reduce numbers. Products containing cyfluthrin, lambda-cyhalothrin or permethrin are labeled for this purpose. Aerosols or foggers can be effective for short periods of time, and professional applicators can be contracted when homeowners do not want to make applications themselves.

Personal protection from bites can be accomplished by wearing long-sleeved shirts and pants and applying DEET. Young children should be protected with lower percentage DEET products.

  • Front.nok Hok
    GAMES DAY—Finn Molitierno (right) celebrates a goal during a game of Nok Hockey with his sister, Kyla. The two tried out a variety of games Saturday at Stair District Library’s annual International Games Day event. One of the activities featured a sort of scavenger hunt in which participants had to locate facts presented in the Smithsonian Hometown Teams exhibit. The traveling show left Morenci’s library Tuesday, wrapping up a series of programs that began Oct. 2. Additional photos are on page 7.
  • Station.2
    STRANGE STUFF—Morenci Elementary School students learn that blue isn’t really blue when seen through the right color of lens. Volunteer April Pike presents the lesson to students at one of the many stations brought to the school by the COSI science center. The theme of this year’s visit was the solar system.
  • Front.leaves
    MAPLE leaves show their fall colors in a puddle at Morenci’s Riverside Natural Area. “This was a great year for colors,” said local weather watcher George Isobar. Chilly mornings will give way to seasonable fall temperatures for the next two weeks.
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    MORENCI Marching Band member Brittany Dennis keeps the beat Friday during the half-time show of the Morenci/Pittsford football game. Color guard member Jordan Cordts is at the left. The band performed this season under the direction of Doyle Rodenbeck who served as Morenci’s band director in the 1970s. He’s serving as a substitute during a family leave.
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    MOVING EAST—Utility workers continue their slow progress east along U.S. 20 south of Morenci. New electrical poles are put in place before wiring is moved into place.
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    A PERFORMER named Biligbaatar, a member of the AnDa Union troupe from Inner Mongolia, dances at Stair District Library last week during a visit to the Midwest. The nine-member group blends a variety of traditions from Inner and Outer Mongolia. The music is described as drawing from “all the Mongol tribes that Genghis Khan unified.” The group considers itself music gatherers whose goal is to preserve traditional sounds of Mongolia. Biligbaatar grew up among traditional herders who live in yurts. Additional photos are on the back page of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.bear
    HOLDEN HUTCHISON gives a hug to a black bear cub—the product of a taxidermist’s skills—at the Michigan DNR’s Great Youth Jamboree. The event on Sunday marked the fourth year of the Jamboree. Additional photos are on page 12.

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