The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Front.cheers
    MACEE BEERS joins other Fayette Elementary School students for the annual Mini-Cheer performance during the half-time break at the basketball game.
  • Family.3.wide
    CHILDREN at Stair District Library’s Family Story Time toss scarves into the air during an activity. The evening program provided a mix of stories, songs, dancing, crafts and snacks Monday evening. The program is offered at 5:30 p.m. every Monday for five more weeks. The program is designed for three to five year olds and their family.
  • Front.newpaper.2
    THE INTERVIEW—Evelyn Joughin (right) records the interaction with an iPad while Jack Varga, next to her, asks questions of Morenci Elementary School principal Gail Frey. Morenci senior Sam Cool (standing) listens. Cool serves as the editor for the newspaper written by members of Mrs. Barrett’s second grade class.
  • Front.code.2
    WRITING CODE—Brock Christle (left), a Morenci fifth grade student, takes a look at the progress being made by fourth grader Anthony Lewis. Libby Rorick, a sixth grade student, is next in a line of girls trying out the coding tutorials. This year marked Morenci’s second year of participation in the Hour of Code project.
  • Front.skelton.vigil
    MORENCI’S three Skelton brothers were remembered with both tears and laughter last week during a candlelight vigil at Wakefield Park. Several people came out of the crowd to give their recollection of the boys who have now been missing for five years.
  • Front.gym.new
    REMIE RYAN (left) tries to dodge the foam wand held by Hayden Bays during physical education class at Morenci Elementary School. In the background, Lauryn Dominique and Brooklyn Williams stay clear of the tag. Second grade students were working on cardiovascular health on the first day back from vacation. For the record, Safety Tag is a very difficult sport to photograph.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.

Mosquito control 6.30.2010

Written by David Green.

The recent rainfall has lead to ideal conditions for mosquitoes to flourish. There are over 60 different species of mosquitoes in Ohio, but they all have a common life cycle—from egg, to larvae, to pupa to adult. Depending on the species and temperature, the insect can produce a new adult population in less than seven days. Adult mosquitoes can be active for 30 days.

Mosquitoes require standing water to complete the larvae and pupa life cycle stages. Reducing the presence of standing water can be helpful in reducing insect numbers and is a good form of control.

When it is not practical to eliminate standing water, larvicides can be used in the water to control early development.

There are two types of larvicides. An insect growth regulator called methoprene kills the larvae or wriggler stage. A homeowner version of this product is sold under the label of PreStrike.

The second type is a Bti product which is a bacterial product. Homeowner versions of this are sold under the label Mosquito Dunks or Quick Kill. These products are sold in solid forms of either briquettes or granules with the treatment amount based on the size of area treated.

During the day adult mosquitoes will rest in protected areas such as trees, shrubs and other dense vegetation. Removal of this vegetation or treatment with insecticides can reduce numbers. Products containing cyfluthrin, lambda-cyhalothrin or permethrin are labeled for this purpose. Aerosols or foggers can be effective for short periods of time, and professional applicators can be contracted when homeowners do not want to make applications themselves.

Personal protection from bites can be accomplished by wearing long-sleeved shirts and pants and applying DEET. Young children should be protected with lower percentage DEET products.

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