The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Front.cheers
    MACEE BEERS joins other Fayette Elementary School students for the annual Mini-Cheer performance during the half-time break at the basketball game.
  • Family.3.wide
    CHILDREN at Stair District Library’s Family Story Time toss scarves into the air during an activity. The evening program provided a mix of stories, songs, dancing, crafts and snacks Monday evening. The program is offered at 5:30 p.m. every Monday for five more weeks. The program is designed for three to five year olds and their family.
  • Front.newpaper.2
    THE INTERVIEW—Evelyn Joughin (right) records the interaction with an iPad while Jack Varga, next to her, asks questions of Morenci Elementary School principal Gail Frey. Morenci senior Sam Cool (standing) listens. Cool serves as the editor for the newspaper written by members of Mrs. Barrett’s second grade class.
  • Front.code.2
    WRITING CODE—Brock Christle (left), a Morenci fifth grade student, takes a look at the progress being made by fourth grader Anthony Lewis. Libby Rorick, a sixth grade student, is next in a line of girls trying out the coding tutorials. This year marked Morenci’s second year of participation in the Hour of Code project.
  • Front.skelton.vigil
    MORENCI’S three Skelton brothers were remembered with both tears and laughter last week during a candlelight vigil at Wakefield Park. Several people came out of the crowd to give their recollection of the boys who have now been missing for five years.
  • Front.gym.new
    REMIE RYAN (left) tries to dodge the foam wand held by Hayden Bays during physical education class at Morenci Elementary School. In the background, Lauryn Dominique and Brooklyn Williams stay clear of the tag. Second grade students were working on cardiovascular health on the first day back from vacation. For the record, Safety Tag is a very difficult sport to photograph.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.

Kellen Keiser battling leukemia again 05.19.10

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

It was as if a dark cloud settled over Fayette last week when news spread about the health of Kellen Keiser.

Following treatments for acute lymphoblastic leukemia last summer, the Fayette freshman finally returned to school over the winter and his prognosis improved.

He joined the baseball team and had the opportunity to start a JV game at second base. He took part in other school activities, including the prom.

But he started to feel some discomfort  this spring and was running a low fever. His parents, Kirk and Tina Keiser, suspected influenza, but when the fever kept hanging on, they took their son to St. Vincent Medical Center in Toledo for testing.

“His blood counts were fine,” Kirk said, “so the doctor figured it was a bacterial and viral infection. But then his counts started to fall so they checked his bone marrow [through an MRI scan] and discovered the leukemia had returned.”

Many people in the area were cheering for Kellen’s improvement in the fight against his disease and news of the reversal hit hard.

The person who seems to remain the most optimistic is Kellen himself.

“He’s handled it better than everyone else, I think,” Kirk said. “He never ceases to amaze me.”

His return to school and related activities make his new absence all the more noticeable.

“He made a couple plays in the baseball game along with one miss, but he did great,” Kirk said. “It was wonderful seeing him out there being a ‘normal kid.’”

Kellen faces some tough days ahead—more than 100 chemotherapy treatments followed by a bone marrow transplant.

The regimen varies within each of the three rounds of five-week chemo treatments, Kirk said. He starts off with twice-a-week appointments followed by nearly daily treatments in the second and third week.

His time away from the hospital will vary  with the schedule and how Kellen is feeling.

“He’ll likely be at the hospital more than he was last year because the treatments are more intense,” Kirk explained.

Once he stabilizes from the chemo, it’s off to Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus for a 100-day stay during the transplant process.

Kirk said he’s been asked by friends about the possibility of them becoming a bone marrow donor and he’s still seeking information about how people can help.

Kirk said he and his wife were tested last week to see if they could become donors. They’ll have an answer in a couple of weeks.

The Keiser’s daughters, Emilie and Zoee, have a one in four chance of matching up, Kirk said, while he and his wife have a one in eight chance.

“If we don’t match, they will go to the national donor registry,” he said.

Kirk said he’s told his children there are times when life just doesn’t seem fair.

“But it’s what you do in those times that matters,” he said.

“We continue to keep faith and ask others to do the same.”

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