Fayette sidewalk inspection to begin 4.21.10

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

Fayette’s sidewalk inspection program got underway April 12 when Public Safety committee members walked Main and Fayette streets looking for safety concerns.

Other sections of the town will be inspected during the next four years in the annual inspection effort, however, if a complaint is received about a safety issue, the sidewalk will be inspected within 48 hours.

Village officials inspected the entire village in 2008 and learned there was about 2.8 miles of sidewalk meeting code and another 10 miles of either substandard walk or no sidewalk at all.

Plans call for the village to be divided into quadrants for future inspections: southwest quadrant in 2011; northwest in 2012; northeast in 2013; and the southeast in 2014.

Police chief Jason Simon joined the committee for the inspection walk and said the first step is to look at repair and replacement needs for existing walks.

Eventually walks should be installed where none currently exist, he said. He believes a public meeting should be scheduled to explain the long-term goals of the committee.

There are three or four areas zoned as subdivisions that don’t require sidewalks and those neighborhoods would be exempt from constructing walks.

When the current sidewalk policy was approved by council in 2008, there was talk of a $20 refundable permit fee, but village administrator Amy Metz said that a fee would not be charged because Public Safety committee members will handle the inspection.

Specifications call for walks to be four feet wide and four inches deep, poured over a compacted aggregate base. Driveway approaches must be thicker. Walks must have a one-inch traverse slope toward the street.

Walks ruled not in compliance must be repaired within 60 days of notification.

CLEAN-UP—Council voted to schedule a spring clean-up beginning at 7 a.m. May 1. The curbside service must be paid in advance at village hall, with a minimum charge of $20.

Residents must pay $20 a hopper load which is about two cubic feet or a pickup truck load.

Loose items must be bagged or in containers weighing less than 30 pounds each. Certified trash cans with handles must be used rather than 55-gallon drums. Loose items that won’t fit in a container must be bundled.

Paint cans must be dry and with the lids removed. Liquids are not allowed.

A complete list of guidelines is available at the village hall.

BRUSH—Curbside brush chipping started this week and continues through May 28. Each property will be passed at least twice during the six-week period.

A list of guidelines for brush pick-up is also available at the village hall. Residents may also transport brush on their own to the village garage near the water tower.

PROJECT PRIDE—Mayor Ruth Marlatt intends to get the Project Pride program going again for 2010. Marlatt started the effort in 2009 and wants to expand this year.

“Basically we’re trying to restore some pride in our community, mostly with home and property improvements,” she said. “I’m trying to set up some dates so we can get things rolling again.”

Additional details will be released later.

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