Fayette council discusses Dollar General 02.03.10

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

A zoning change for a proposed Dollar General store got the green light Thursday from the Fayette village council, but not without discussion about flooding problems.

Council unanimously approved a recommendation from the zoning board to change the classification of a parcel from residential to highway commercial. The property, owned by Don and Jane Stiriz, measures 160 feet wide along Main Street and 330 feet deep. The property is located next to the Rorick Bed and Breakfast at 611 W. Main, owned by the Stirizes.

A developer from Alabama will build the store, explained civil engineer Andrew Rossell of Hurley and Stewart, the company overseeing the design of the project.

Rossell said fencing would be erected along the west side of the store and lighting could be shielded to direct the light onto the property and not into residential areas.

A detention basin behind the store would control surface water runoff from the roof and parking area.

Flooding

Village administrator Amy Metz read a letter from Anita and Jerry Van Zile that said adding commercial property to a residential area tends to decrease property values. The Van Ziles live close to the property, but across the street.

The letter said the property is quick to flood and suggested the situation will probably worsen with the new building.

An old storm water line fails to handle the flow during heavy precipitation events, Metz said, and the line is probably blocked.

Rossell said he doesn’t anticipate any changes in flooding.

“Our development, I assure you, won’t increase the problem,” he said.

He said the detention basin will be designed to handle a 100-year rain event, but outflow from the basin will be limited to that experienced from a five-year event, or about 2.4 inches. Anything heavier should actually result in an improvement.

Metz noted the parcel is less than three percent of the adjacent land and rain falling on the parking area and roof would have little effect on the overall flow of water. Rossell said about 80 acres of land drains toward the Van Zile property.

Location

The Van Ziles also questioned why that location was chosen. Real estate agent Gene Beaverson said several areas were explored—both in town and on the edge of the village that would require annexation.

“There just isn’t anything available in town,” he said, not without tearing several buildings down.

Councilor Mike Maginn asked about using federal grants to retrofit existing vacant buildings. Beaverson said many old buildings, including some he owns, are just junk.

“I don’t see anything that they’re usable for,” he said.

Parking downtown is also an issue, Metz said, noting that the post office parking lot is private.

Audience member Kirk Keiser said it’s a similar situation with old barns. They’re often not conducive to modern farming practices and pole buildings often take their place. Unfortunately, he said, many of the large downtown buildings don’t serve the purposes needed today.

Metz read a review from the Fulton County Regional Planning Commission that noted the area was in the past considered for the development of a commercial/industrial park.

Advantages

Metz presented tax advantages for the existing value of the property ($3,390) vs. the estimated cost of the building ($403,390). The store would generate $8,342 tax dollars compared to the existing $59.

Of the $8,342, about $5,200 would go to the school district’s general fund and $721 to the school bond fund. The township would receive $385 and the village would receive $710.

Withholding taxes would also go to the village from the estimated three full-time jobs and seven part-time.

Paula Ferguson asked if any other response was received from neighbors. Metz said she received several calls inquiring about the issue, but no other negative comments.

Keiser, who lives across from the proposed store, said he’s excited about development and welcomes the benefits to the village and school.

With the rezoning in place, Rossell said, developers can move on to the next stage in planning.

FENCE—Council also approved a variance at Eagle Car Wash that allows a portion of a fence to be closer than the required 18 inch setback.

The property isn’t square, Metz said, and the fence was erected along the edge of the concrete.

The property owner and the tenant living in the house, located behind the car wash, were said to both be in agreement with waiving the requirement.

Ruger thanked Metz for her persistence in getting the fence erected. It was long overdue, she said.

  • Front.train
    WRECKAGE—Morenci Fire Department member Taylor Schisler walks past the smoking wreckage of a semi-truck tractor on the north side of the Norfolk and Southern Railroad tracks on Ranger Highway. The truck trailer was on the south side of the tracks
  • Front.sculpta
    SCULPTORS—Morenci third grade students Emersyn Thompson (left) and Marissa Lawrence turn spaghetti sticks into mini sculptures Friday during a class visit to Stair District Library. All Morenci Elementary School classes recently visited the library to experience the creative construction toys purchased through the “Sculptamania!” project, funded by a Disney Curiosity Creates grant. The grant is administered by the Association for Library Services to Children, a division of the American Library Association.
  • Funcolor
    LEONIE LEAHY was one of three local hair stylists who volunteered time Friday at the Morenci PTO Fun Night. Her customer, Aubrey Sandusky, looks up at her mother while her hair takes on a perfect match to her outfit. Leahy said she had a great time at the event—nothing but happy clients.
  • Shadow.salon
    LEARNING THE ROPES—Kristy Castillo (left), co-owner of Mane Street Salon, works with Kendal Kuhn as Sierra Orner takes a phone call. The two Morenci Area High School juniors spent Friday at the salon as part of a job shadowing experience.
  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
  • Front.winner
    REFEREE Camden Miller raises the hand of Morenci Jr. Dawgs wrestler Ryder Ryan as his opponent leaves the mat in disappointment. Morenci’s youth wrestling program served as host for a tournament Saturday morning to raise money for the club. Additional photos are on the back page.
  • Front.bank.2
    SHERWOOD STATE Bank opened its Fayette office at a grand opening Friday morning, drawing a large crowd to view the renovated building. Above, Burt Blue talks to teller Cindy Funk, while his wife, Jackie, looks around the new office. The Blues missed the opening and took a quick tour on Tuesday. Few traces remain of the former grocery store and theater, however, part of the original brick wall still shows in the hallway leading to the back of the building. The drive-through window should be ready for customers later in the month.
  • Front.make.three
    FROM THE LEFT, Landon Wilkins, Ryan White and Logan Blaker try out their artistic skills Saturday afternoon at the Morenci PTO’s first Date to Create event. More than 50 people showed up to create decorated planks of wood to hang from rope. The event served as a fund-raiser for miscellaneous PTO projects. Additional photos are on the back of this week’s Observer.

Weekly newspaper serving SE Michigan and NW Ohio - State Line Observer ©2006-2016