Humane Society to open in Fulton County 12.16

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

There’s only one county among Ohio’s 88 that doesn’t have an active humane society. If Sondra Metts has her way, that last county—Fulton—will soon join in with the others.

The Fulton County Humane Society existed in the past, Metts said, but the organization folded in the 1990s. In its previous existence, it served primarily as a home for needy cats. She wants the reorganized group to broaden its focus and include dogs and other animals.

“As much as we love cats, we want to open it up to dogs and even livestock,” said Metts, a rural Fayette resident.

She knows of someone who has rescued several horses in need of care.

There’s one other change that Metts considers essential for a new group to succeed: It must be a grassroots effort that involves citizens from throughout the county.

A board of directors will oversee the major efforts of the agency, but auxiliary boards will serve as the driving force behind various activities, including fund raising. She hopes to attract a couple dozen people to provide a more community-oriented approach.

“We want to make sure we can do what the community wants,” Metts said, and that will likely vary from town to town.

She’s spoken with Humane Society directors from several other chapters and they all convinced her of the importance of an auxiliary board. That board will be further broken down into committees.

Anyone interested in joining the group should be able to attend a monthly meeting and have a sincere interest in developing programs for the agency. That, Metts said, along with a love of animals.

It will be up to the auxiliary group to decide what projects it would like to tackle.

Metts said she and board members have looked at a few possible locations for a shelter and hope to begin narrowing the search.

Her big fantasy, she said, would be to replicate the effort in Williams County where an unused building was donated and ample financial donations paid for renovation and the initial operation of the agency.

She and others have worked toward the organization of a new Humane Society over the past six months. Metts believes the time is past for Fulton residents to rely on assistance from surrounding communities.

“Every other county does it so I don’t think it’s undoable,” she said.

Fulton County dog warden Pete Skeldon handled about 1,200 dogs in the past year, Metts said, and some neighboring Humane Society organizations tally a total of about 2,400 various animals annually.

Metts said Skeldon strongly endorses a Humane Society group and county sheriff Darrell Merillat also lends support.

The group has obtained 501(c)(3) tax-exempt status for donations and Metts says not to let the words “Fulton County” in the title mislead you. It’s not a county agency and all Humane Societies operate independently. The operation will depend entirely on donations and fund-raisers.

The next step is to create the auxiliary board.

“That’s where we want to put our growth,” Metts said. “That group will direct energy back into each community.”

• For more information, write to Fulton County Humane Society, PO Box 532, Archbold, OH 43502, or send e-mail to [email protected]

  • Homecoming Court
    HOMECOMING—One senior candidate will be chosen Morenci’s fall homecoming queen during half-time ceremonies Friday at the football field. In the back row are seniors Mikayla Price, who will be escorted by Mason Vaughn; Madison Bachman, escorted by Kiegan Merillat, and Mikayla Reinke, escorted by Griffin Grieder. Senior Ariana Roseman is absent from the photo. Her escort is Garrett Smith. In the front is sophomore Abbie White, who will be escorted by Ryder Price; junior Madysen Schmitz, escorted by Harley McCaskey and freshman Madison Keller, escorted by Jarett Cook.
  • Front.cross
    HUDSON RUNNER Jacob Morgan looks toward the top of the hill with dismay during the tough finish at Harrison Lake State Park. Fayette runner Jacob Garrow focuses on the summit, also, during the Eagle Invitational cross country run Saturday morning. Continuing rain and drizzle made the course even more challenging. Results of the race are in this week’s Observer.
  • Front.bear
    HOLDEN HUTCHISON gives a hug to a black bear cub—the product of a taxidermist’s skills—at the Michigan DNR’s Great Youth Jamboree. The event on Sunday marked the fourth year of the Jamboree. Additional photos are on page 12.
  • Front.crossing
    Crossing over—Jim Heiney was given a U.S. flag to carry by George Vereecke (behind Jim in the hat), turning him into the leader of the parade. Bridge Walk participants cross over Bean Creek while, in the background, members of the Morenci Legion Riders cross the main traffic bridge on East Street South. Additional photos appear on the back page of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.hose Testing
    HOSE safety—The FireCatt hose testing company from Troy put Morenci Fire Department hose to the test Monday morning when Mill Street was closed to traffic. The company also checks nozzles and ladders for wear in an effort to keep fire fighters safe while on calls.
  • Front.starting
    BIKE-A-THON—Children in Morenci’s Summer Recreation Program brought their bikes last Tuesday to participate in a bike-a-thon. Riders await the start of the event at the elementary school before being led on a course through town by organizer Leonie Leahy.
  • Front.train
    WRECKAGE—Morenci Fire Department member Taylor Schisler walks past the smoking wreckage of a semi-truck tractor on the north side of the Norfolk and Southern Railroad tracks on Ranger Highway. The truck trailer was on the south side of the tracks

Weekly newspaper serving SE Michigan and NW Ohio - State Line Observer ©2006-2016