• Shadow.salon
    LEARNING THE ROPES—Kristy Castillo (left), co-owner of Mane Street Salon, works with Kendal Kuhn as Sierra Orner takes a phone call. The two Morenci Area High School juniors spent Friday at the salon as part of a job shadowing experience.
  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
  • Front.winner
    REFEREE Camden Miller raises the hand of Morenci Jr. Dawgs wrestler Ryder Ryan as his opponent leaves the mat in disappointment. Morenci’s youth wrestling program served as host for a tournament Saturday morning to raise money for the club. Additional photos are on the back page.
  • Front.bank.2
    SHERWOOD STATE Bank opened its Fayette office at a grand opening Friday morning, drawing a large crowd to view the renovated building. Above, Burt Blue talks to teller Cindy Funk, while his wife, Jackie, looks around the new office. The Blues missed the opening and took a quick tour on Tuesday. Few traces remain of the former grocery store and theater, however, part of the original brick wall still shows in the hallway leading to the back of the building. The drive-through window should be ready for customers later in the month.
  • Front.carry.casket
    CARRYING—Riley Terry (blue jacket) and Mason Vaughn lead the way, carrying an empty casket outside to the hearse waiting at the curb. Morenci juniors and seniors visited Eagle Funeral Home last week to learn about the role of a funeral director and to understand the process of arranging for a funeral.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.make.three
    FROM THE LEFT, Landon Wilkins, Ryan White and Logan Blaker try out their artistic skills Saturday afternoon at the Morenci PTO’s first Date to Create event. More than 50 people showed up to create decorated planks of wood to hang from rope. The event served as a fund-raiser for miscellaneous PTO projects. Additional photos are on the back of this week’s Observer.

Humane Society to open in Fulton County 12.16

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

There’s only one county among Ohio’s 88 that doesn’t have an active humane society. If Sondra Metts has her way, that last county—Fulton—will soon join in with the others.

The Fulton County Humane Society existed in the past, Metts said, but the organization folded in the 1990s. In its previous existence, it served primarily as a home for needy cats. She wants the reorganized group to broaden its focus and include dogs and other animals.

“As much as we love cats, we want to open it up to dogs and even livestock,” said Metts, a rural Fayette resident.

She knows of someone who has rescued several horses in need of care.

There’s one other change that Metts considers essential for a new group to succeed: It must be a grassroots effort that involves citizens from throughout the county.

A board of directors will oversee the major efforts of the agency, but auxiliary boards will serve as the driving force behind various activities, including fund raising. She hopes to attract a couple dozen people to provide a more community-oriented approach.

“We want to make sure we can do what the community wants,” Metts said, and that will likely vary from town to town.

She’s spoken with Humane Society directors from several other chapters and they all convinced her of the importance of an auxiliary board. That board will be further broken down into committees.

Anyone interested in joining the group should be able to attend a monthly meeting and have a sincere interest in developing programs for the agency. That, Metts said, along with a love of animals.

It will be up to the auxiliary group to decide what projects it would like to tackle.

Metts said she and board members have looked at a few possible locations for a shelter and hope to begin narrowing the search.

Her big fantasy, she said, would be to replicate the effort in Williams County where an unused building was donated and ample financial donations paid for renovation and the initial operation of the agency.

She and others have worked toward the organization of a new Humane Society over the past six months. Metts believes the time is past for Fulton residents to rely on assistance from surrounding communities.

“Every other county does it so I don’t think it’s undoable,” she said.

Fulton County dog warden Pete Skeldon handled about 1,200 dogs in the past year, Metts said, and some neighboring Humane Society organizations tally a total of about 2,400 various animals annually.

Metts said Skeldon strongly endorses a Humane Society group and county sheriff Darrell Merillat also lends support.

The group has obtained 501(c)(3) tax-exempt status for donations and Metts says not to let the words “Fulton County” in the title mislead you. It’s not a county agency and all Humane Societies operate independently. The operation will depend entirely on donations and fund-raisers.

The next step is to create the auxiliary board.

“That’s where we want to put our growth,” Metts said. “That group will direct energy back into each community.”

• For more information, write to Fulton County Humane Society, PO Box 532, Archbold, OH 43502, or send e-mail to [email protected]

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