The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Front.cheers
    MACEE BEERS joins other Fayette Elementary School students for the annual Mini-Cheer performance during the half-time break at the basketball game.
  • Family.3.wide
    CHILDREN at Stair District Library’s Family Story Time toss scarves into the air during an activity. The evening program provided a mix of stories, songs, dancing, crafts and snacks Monday evening. The program is offered at 5:30 p.m. every Monday for five more weeks. The program is designed for three to five year olds and their family.
  • Front.newpaper.2
    THE INTERVIEW—Evelyn Joughin (right) records the interaction with an iPad while Jack Varga, next to her, asks questions of Morenci Elementary School principal Gail Frey. Morenci senior Sam Cool (standing) listens. Cool serves as the editor for the newspaper written by members of Mrs. Barrett’s second grade class.
  • Front.code.2
    WRITING CODE—Brock Christle (left), a Morenci fifth grade student, takes a look at the progress being made by fourth grader Anthony Lewis. Libby Rorick, a sixth grade student, is next in a line of girls trying out the coding tutorials. This year marked Morenci’s second year of participation in the Hour of Code project.
  • Front.gym.new
    REMIE RYAN (left) tries to dodge the foam wand held by Hayden Bays during physical education class at Morenci Elementary School. In the background, Lauryn Dominique and Brooklyn Williams stay clear of the tag. Second grade students were working on cardiovascular health on the first day back from vacation. For the record, Safety Tag is a very difficult sport to photograph.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.library.books
    MACK DICKSON takes a book off the “blind date” cart at the Fayette library. Patrons can choose a book without knowing what’s inside other than a general category. The books are among those designated for removal so patrons can consider them gifts. In Morenci, new books and staff favorites were chosen from the stacks and must be returned. Patrons get a piece of chocolate, too, to take on their date, but no clue about their “date.” One reader said she really enjoyed her book for a few pages, but then lost interest—so typical for a blind date.

Humane Society to open in Fulton County 12.16

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

There’s only one county among Ohio’s 88 that doesn’t have an active humane society. If Sondra Metts has her way, that last county—Fulton—will soon join in with the others.

The Fulton County Humane Society existed in the past, Metts said, but the organization folded in the 1990s. In its previous existence, it served primarily as a home for needy cats. She wants the reorganized group to broaden its focus and include dogs and other animals.

“As much as we love cats, we want to open it up to dogs and even livestock,” said Metts, a rural Fayette resident.

She knows of someone who has rescued several horses in need of care.

There’s one other change that Metts considers essential for a new group to succeed: It must be a grassroots effort that involves citizens from throughout the county.

A board of directors will oversee the major efforts of the agency, but auxiliary boards will serve as the driving force behind various activities, including fund raising. She hopes to attract a couple dozen people to provide a more community-oriented approach.

“We want to make sure we can do what the community wants,” Metts said, and that will likely vary from town to town.

She’s spoken with Humane Society directors from several other chapters and they all convinced her of the importance of an auxiliary board. That board will be further broken down into committees.

Anyone interested in joining the group should be able to attend a monthly meeting and have a sincere interest in developing programs for the agency. That, Metts said, along with a love of animals.

It will be up to the auxiliary group to decide what projects it would like to tackle.

Metts said she and board members have looked at a few possible locations for a shelter and hope to begin narrowing the search.

Her big fantasy, she said, would be to replicate the effort in Williams County where an unused building was donated and ample financial donations paid for renovation and the initial operation of the agency.

She and others have worked toward the organization of a new Humane Society over the past six months. Metts believes the time is past for Fulton residents to rely on assistance from surrounding communities.

“Every other county does it so I don’t think it’s undoable,” she said.

Fulton County dog warden Pete Skeldon handled about 1,200 dogs in the past year, Metts said, and some neighboring Humane Society organizations tally a total of about 2,400 various animals annually.

Metts said Skeldon strongly endorses a Humane Society group and county sheriff Darrell Merillat also lends support.

The group has obtained 501(c)(3) tax-exempt status for donations and Metts says not to let the words “Fulton County” in the title mislead you. It’s not a county agency and all Humane Societies operate independently. The operation will depend entirely on donations and fund-raisers.

The next step is to create the auxiliary board.

“That’s where we want to put our growth,” Metts said. “That group will direct energy back into each community.”

• For more information, write to Fulton County Humane Society, PO Box 532, Archbold, OH 43502, or send e-mail to [email protected]

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