Fayette Elementary celebrates award 11.25.09

Written by David Green.

SHOWING IT OFF—Gavin Rufenacht (left) and Rylee Ruger were chosen to hold the School of Promise banner during the celebration Thursday morning. The banner was hung in the hallway near the school entrance.


Fayette Elementary School students gathered in the gymnasium Thursday morning to celebrate the Schools of Promise award from the Ohio State Department of Education.

Principal Dr. LuAnn Boyer told the 260-some students that she brought them together to celebrate all the great work they’ve done to win the award.

Superintendent Russ Griggs read letters of congratulations from U.S. Rep. Robert Latta and State Sen. Steven Buehrer.

“What this means to me,” Supt. Griggs said, “is that you’ve been working very hard.”

The effort will make the students better prepared for adult life, he said.

The state honored 134 of more than 3,000 public schools. In Fulton and Williams counties, the award also went to Wauseon’s Elm Street School, Hilltop Elementary School and Bryan’s Lincoln Elementary School.

Criteria for the award include meeting requirements for adequate yearly academic promise; having at least 75 percent of students passing the state achievement test; and showing continuing academic progress from year to year throughout the student body. A district must also have at least 40 percent of students considered economically disadvantaged.

Dr. Boyer announced the results of a vote to determine where the banner would be hung. Winning by one vote was the inside wall near the entrance to the school. The cafeteria was the second choice.

Several students read short essays about what they think the School of Promise award means.

We are a School of Promise. Being a School of Promise is hard, but it is sometimes fun. My favorite part of it is that you get to learn new things and you get to do cool things too. But the hardest thing of all is the tests. They are sometimes fun too.

– Ryan Lucas

I think a School of Promise means students trying to reach their goals, and students aiming high, all students getting along. I think a School of Promise looks like regular school on the outside, but inside everyone appreciates everybody and everything, and people respect other people. But best of all a School of Promise means a great school. Like Fayette Local Schools!!

– Baiylee Lynn Marie Ruger

We are 1 out of 134 schools to get this award. Here’s proof to show that we are proud of this award. We are proud of our Ohio test scores last year and will be proud this year. We are also proud of our teachers for doing so well teaching us. Even with difficult times at home we are still at school ready to learn and work hard. It surprises me that being a small town we get a big award so thank you for this award and we’ll try hard next year.

– Kylie Nuoffer

The School of Promise is when everyone in the morning said the pledge and we make a promise that we will try our best every day. I think it also means no bullying. Also it means we respect teachers and appreciate our parents and the school. I think School of Promise looks like a drug free school, an independent school, and a resourceful school. I also think it looks like a good set of examples for other schools and other classmates and even people not in school.

– Brynne Riegsecker

I feel lucky to be going to a School of Promise. I think we got this award because we have great teachers and kids. We all work together on making a good school. I think the School of Promise is an award that is from Ohio thinking that we are a good school. I also think that we got it because we have sports and other things. This is what I think the School of Promise is!

– Caitlin McIntosh

Fayette Elementary is a School of Promise for many reasons. Our teachers help us learn the many necessary things we need to know. We encourage our peers to keep a drug free and bully free environment. We have many helpful things to better our learning environment including an awesome playground and lots of technology. Our community also helps us by contributing in many ways to keep students on our path to success. We love all the things that make our school an Ohio School of Promise.

– Mr. Brad Raby’s sixth grade class

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