The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Snow.2
    FIRST SNOW—Heavy, wet flakes piled deep on tree branches—and windshields—as the area received its first significant snowfall of the season. “Usually it begins with a dusting or two,” said George Isobar, Morenci’s observer for the National Weather Service, “but this time it came with a vengeance.” By the end of the day Saturday, a little over four inches of snow was on the ground. Now comes the thaw with temperatures in the 40s and 50s for three days.
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    SKEWERS, gumdrops, and marshmallows are all that’s needed to create interesting shapes and designs for Layla McDowell Saturday at Stair District Library’s “Sculptamania!” Open House. The program featuring design games and materials is one part of a larger project funded by a $7,500 Curiosity Creates grant from Disney and the American Library Association. Additional photos are on page 7.
    Morenci marching band members took to the field Friday night dressed for Halloween during the Bulldog’s first playoff game. Morenci fans had a bit of a scare until the fourth quarter when the Bulldogs scored 30 points to leave Lenawee Christian School behind. Whiteford visits Morenci this Friday for the district championship game. From the left is Clayton Borton, Morgan Merillat and James O’Brien.
    DNA PUZZLE—Mitchell Storrs and Wyatt Mohr tackle a puzzle representing the structure of DNA. There’s only one correct way for all the pieces to fit. It’s one of the new materials that can be used in both biology and chemistry classes, said teacher Loretta Cox.
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    A TRAFFIC control worker stands in the middle of Morenci’s Main Street Tuesday morning, waiting for the next flow of vehicles to be let through from the west. The dusty gravel surface was sealed with a layer of tar, leaving only the application of paint for new striping. The project was completed in conjunction with county road commission work west of Morenci.
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    JUNIORS Jazmin Smith and Trevor Corkle struggle against a team from the sophomore class Friday during the annual tug of war at the Homecoming Games pep rally. Even the seniors struggled against the sophomores who won the competition. At the main course of the day, the Bulldog football team struggled against Whiteford in a homecoming loss.
    YOUNG soccer players surived a chilly morning Saturday in Morenci’s PTO league. From the left is Emma Cordts, Wayne Corser, Carter and Levi Seitz, Briella York and Drew Joughin. Two more weeks of soccer remain for this season.
  • Front.ropes
    BOWEN BAUMGARTNER of Morenci makes his way across a rope bridge constructed by the Tecumseh Boy Scout troop Sunday at Lake Hudson Recreation Area. The bridge was one of many challenges, displays and games set up for the annual Youth Jamboree by the Michigan DNR. Additional photos on are the back page of this week’s Observer.
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    One of four senior candidates will be crowned the fall homecoming queen during half-time of this week’s Morenci-Whiteford football game. In the back row (left to right) is exchange student Kinga Vidor (her escort will be Caylob Alcock), seniors Alli VanBrandt (escorted by Sam Cool), Larissa Elliott (escorted by Clayton Borton), Samantha Wright (escorted by JJ Elarton) and Justis McCowan (escorted by Austin Gilson), and exchange student Rebecca Rosenberger (escorted by Garrett Smith). Front row freshman court member Allie Kaiser (escorted by Anthony Thomas), sophomore Marlee Blaker (escorted by Nate Elarton) and junior Cheyenne Stone (escorted by Dominick Sell).
  • Front.park.lights
    GETTING READY—Jerad Gleckler pounds nails to secure a string of holiday lights on the side of the Wakefield Park concession stand while other members of the Volunteer Club and others hold them in place. The volunteers showed up Sunday afternoon to string lights at the park. The decorating project will continue this Sunday. Denise Walsh is in charge of the effort this year.
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Morenci city council audit report 11.11.09

Written by David Green.


Despite the rough economic times in the state, Morenci city council received good news Monday night from auditor Phil Rubley.

For the second year in a row, Rubley lauded the city’s progress in moving away from the deficit situation of the past and once again posting solid financial gains.

Rubley noted that the projected fund balance was exceed by nearly $50,000.

“You’ve taken the city from a very fragile fund equity and built on it,” he said. “That’s very good. You should be proud of yourselves.”

Rubley said he would like to see a much higher cash balance. He recommends having three months of expenses available, which would require a balance of at least $250,000. The audit showed that as of June 30, the fund balance stood at $154,870.

The sale of property for a cellular communications tower brought in an unexpected influx of $65,000 to help bolster the city’s financial situation.

Rubley reviewed the various major and non-major funds and pronounced them all in good shape with the exception of the Town and Country Festival fund.

Revenue produced an excess of $7,864, but a beginning deficit of $9,046 left the fund in the red.

City administrator/clerk Renée Schroeder said that fund-raising efforts have covered the shortfall since the fiscal year ended.

Rubley said the audit led to an unqualified opinion, meaning the records were all in order and fairly presented.

“You should be commended for that,” he said. “You have a very good report and a very good financial position.”

Rubley cautioned council again this year about the “custodial risk” of investing funds that aren’t entirely insured. By placing funds in only two banks, a large amount of money exceeds the $250,000 federal insurance limit.

Banks are failing across the country, he noted, and to protect savings, council should consider moving some long-term CDs to other locations.

LEAVES—Leaf collection got underway this week, said city supervisor Barney Vanderpool. He’s been short of help and collection was delayed. After work along Main Street, DPW workers will begin collecting on the south side of town.

FIRE—Joshua Oltz was approved as a new member of the fire department and the wording was read on a plaque presented to the department from the Rohr family.

POLICE—Council approved hiring Richard Dover as a part-time police officer.

Police chief Larry Weeks told council about the availability of two Michigan State Police troopers who specialize in crime scene investigation.

Their skills will provide an extremely valuable service to Morenci and other smaller communities, the chief said.

Weeks told council that the new police cruiser is in service. The car is painted white and has new graphics that were designed by Simi Air. The vehicle cost about $18,000 through a state bidding process.

NEW ASSIGNMENTS—New mayor Keith Pennington announced the following committee assignments:

• Public Safety—Tracy Schell (chair), Joe Varga (vice chair) and Leasa Slocum.

• Public Works—Art Erbskorn (chair), Jason Cook (vice chair) and Varga.

• Finance and Legal and Economic Development—Greg Braun (chair), Slocum (vice chair) and Cook.

He named Schell as mayor pro tempore.

Robert Jennings and Brenda Spiess were appointed to fill two planning commission vacancies.

Pennington made no changes in the department heads.

He reminded the audience that the mayor leads the meetings, but other than that the position is mostly symbolic. The mayor gets one vote like all council members have.

He also pointed out that the mayor is not the head of the fire department, police department, etc., and any decisions must be made by the entire council only at a meeting that was announced in advance.

Pennington said that public comment about items on the agenda should be made at the start of the meeting. According to Robert’s Rules of Order, he said, only council members should discuss an issue while moving through the agenda.

The traditional agenda item seeking concerns and questions from the audience will remain as the final order of business before adjourning.

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