Fayette's Habitat for Humanity project nearing the end 10.28.09

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

Marie Double of Delta remembers the day she spoke with a friend at church.

“She had just gotten a Habitat house and she said we should apply,” Marie said.

Marie and her husband, Scott, made their application with Fulton County’s Habitat for Humanity agency and they were chosen as a candidate family.

Habitat representatives visited the family and the Doubles were soon designated for a future building project.

That project is now almost in the past. The Doubles expect to move into their new Fayette home by Thanksgiving.

“Our goal was to have them in for the holidays,” said Fulton Habitat director Kristene Clark. “They might not be all settled in by Thanksgiving, but they should be living there.”

At a work session Saturday, a crew of volunteers was busy hanging drywall and the dusty house looked far from completion.

“Once we get past the drywalling stage, it goes fast,” Clark said. “You’d be surprised.”

As soon as the drywall finishers complete their job, the paint crew will get busy. As soon as that group finishes a room, the floor covering squad will follow closely behind.

Bob “the Builder” Sauder—the supervisor of the Fayette project—said the project is close to being on track and he expects the Doubles to be moved in by Thanksgiving.

That sounds good to Marie, and she’s delighted to be moving to Fayette.

“Actually that was our first choice,” she said. “We wanted something more rural.”

The location on the south edge of the community fulfills that desire.

The Doubles worked the required 250 hours on a Habitat build in Wauseon last summer and easily surpassed the minimum 50 hours on their own house.

“We’d like to get involved in more when we’re done here,” she said.

They aim to keep working because they enjoy spending time with the friendly people who volunteer with Habitat.

Their son, Daniel, 12, worked Saturday attaching drywall, but their five-year-old daughter, Salena, is too young for the work site. Soon they will all be sharing the house together.

The word “house” has a special appeal to Marie. She’s spent her entire life in apartments and trailers.

“This is my first house,” she said.

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