The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Front.sculpt
    SKEWERS, gumdrops, and marshmallows are all that’s needed to create interesting shapes and designs for Layla McDowell Saturday at Stair District Library’s “Sculptamania!” Open House. The program featuring design games and materials is one part of a larger project funded by a $7,500 Curiosity Creates grant from Disney and the American Library Association. Additional photos are on page 7.
    Morenci marching band members took to the field Friday night dressed for Halloween during the Bulldog’s first playoff game. Morenci fans had a bit of a scare until the fourth quarter when the Bulldogs scored 30 points to leave Lenawee Christian School behind. Whiteford visits Morenci this Friday for the district championship game. From the left is Clayton Borton, Morgan Merillat and James O’Brien.
    DNA PUZZLE—Mitchell Storrs and Wyatt Mohr tackle a puzzle representing the structure of DNA. There’s only one correct way for all the pieces to fit. It’s one of the new materials that can be used in both biology and chemistry classes, said teacher Loretta Cox.
  • Front.tar.wide
    A TRAFFIC control worker stands in the middle of Morenci’s Main Street Tuesday morning, waiting for the next flow of vehicles to be let through from the west. The dusty gravel surface was sealed with a layer of tar, leaving only the application of paint for new striping. The project was completed in conjunction with county road commission work west of Morenci.
  • Front.pull
    JUNIORS Jazmin Smith and Trevor Corkle struggle against a team from the sophomore class Friday during the annual tug of war at the Homecoming Games pep rally. Even the seniors struggled against the sophomores who won the competition. At the main course of the day, the Bulldog football team struggled against Whiteford in a homecoming loss.
    YOUNG soccer players surived a chilly morning Saturday in Morenci’s PTO league. From the left is Emma Cordts, Wayne Corser, Carter and Levi Seitz, Briella York and Drew Joughin. Two more weeks of soccer remain for this season.
  • Front.ropes
    BOWEN BAUMGARTNER of Morenci makes his way across a rope bridge constructed by the Tecumseh Boy Scout troop Sunday at Lake Hudson Recreation Area. The bridge was one of many challenges, displays and games set up for the annual Youth Jamboree by the Michigan DNR. Additional photos on are the back page of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.homecoming Court
    One of four senior candidates will be crowned the fall homecoming queen during half-time of this week’s Morenci-Whiteford football game. In the back row (left to right) is exchange student Kinga Vidor (her escort will be Caylob Alcock), seniors Alli VanBrandt (escorted by Sam Cool), Larissa Elliott (escorted by Clayton Borton), Samantha Wright (escorted by JJ Elarton) and Justis McCowan (escorted by Austin Gilson), and exchange student Rebecca Rosenberger (escorted by Garrett Smith). Front row freshman court member Allie Kaiser (escorted by Anthony Thomas), sophomore Marlee Blaker (escorted by Nate Elarton) and junior Cheyenne Stone (escorted by Dominick Sell).
  • Front.park.lights
    GETTING READY—Jerad Gleckler pounds nails to secure a string of holiday lights on the side of the Wakefield Park concession stand while other members of the Volunteer Club and others hold them in place. The volunteers showed up Sunday afternoon to string lights at the park. The decorating project will continue this Sunday. Denise Walsh is in charge of the effort this year.

2006.01.25 Time to plan a wacky Ohio vacation

Written by David Green.


I think Jerome Pohlen is my new hero. He gets to travel to strange places and record them in book form, one state at a time. His “Oddball” series, featuring Illinois, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Colorado, Indiana and Florida so far, has been joined by “Oddball Ohio.” That leaves him 43 states to go, so job security is hardly a problem. He just has to decide where to go next.

The Ohio book offers dozens of great destinations for those planning an extended vacation or just a weird day trip or two. Heck, one attraction in our own backyard even makes the cut: Archbold’s Bathroom Museum.

Actually, as Pohlen explains, this isn’t a museum per se, but rather a display inside Sauder Village consisting of 954 various obsolete bathroom fixtures, including sinks, tubs, toilets, etc. As Pohlen says, “It’s kind of like going to Home Depot, but a century ago.”

He goes on to mention “costumed guides who will show you how to weave a broom out of broomcorn, churn butter by hand, shoe a horse, and make a dress out of a flour sack-skills that will come in handy if the economy keeps going the way it has recently.”

Or, if you’re on a tight schedule, you might consider a short jaunt to Bellefontaine, home of the world’s shortest street. McKinley Street on the town’s west side runs for only 15 feet. If you really like strange streets, continue on to Alliance, said to be the only town in the country with a Main Street that dead ends on both ends.

Remember the Maine? The battleship whose sinking set off the Spanish-American war? Back in 1911, the ship was raised from its underwater grave in Cuba and artifacts were removed before the remains were resunk at sea, with honors. The captain’s bathtub ended up in Ohio, where it can now be seen at Findlay’s Hancock Historical Museum.

In Akron, there’s the former Goodyear blimp hanger, now owned by Lockheed-Martin. When it was built in 1929, it was the world’s largest building without internal supports, measuring 320 feet wide, 1175 feet long, and 211 feet high.

Not that impressive, you say? Consider this. When atmospheric conditions are right, the building’s size allows it to generate its own weather systems inside the building, including clouds and rain.

Rain inside a building might explain why Akron is also home to the world’s largest cockroach, a 15 foot specimen climbing the headquarters building of TNT Exterminating downtown.

East Liverpool is home to the death site of notorious 1930s outlaw Charles “Pretty Boy” Floyd. After being shot and killed by a FBI-led posse, his body was taken to the local funeral home, where swatches of his bloody suit were handed out as souvenirs. The funeral home is now a bed-and-breakfast. The laundry room still contains Floyd’s death mask and a metal stand that held his head during his embalming. And a delicious breakfast is included with your room!

North Canton is home to the Hoover Historical Center, honoring the invention and history of the vacuum cleaner. And please don’t tell them the museum sucks, I’m sure they’ve heard that a thousand times.

Then, maybe you can find your way to Columbus’s Optometry Museum, on the campus of Ohio State. Marvel at the eyeglasses of the stars exhibit, with dozens of pairs donated by celebrities such as John Denver, Richard Petty, Orville Redenbacher, Gerald Ford, Jimmy Buffett and Colonel Sanders. Then go get an eye exam.

And finally, there’s the story of President Harry Truman, who hated Ohio. Not really Ohio itself, but Ohio senator Robert Taft. But it was the state that got the punishment. It’s said that whenever Truman flew over Ohio, he would use Air Force One’s comfort facilities, then order the pilot to dump the holding tanks. This very plane can be seen at the Wright-Patterson museum in Dayton

Visitors to Ohio these days don’t have to watch the skies for falling presidential excrement, however. Since the state helped keep the current president in office, I’m sure the holding tanks are being dumped elsewhere. Just don’t go to Michigan.

– Jan. 25, 2006

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