The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Snow.2
    FIRST SNOW—Heavy, wet flakes piled deep on tree branches—and windshields—as the area received its first significant snowfall of the season. “Usually it begins with a dusting or two,” said George Isobar, Morenci’s observer for the National Weather Service, “but this time it came with a vengeance.” By the end of the day Saturday, a little over four inches of snow was on the ground. Now comes the thaw with temperatures in the 40s and 50s for three days.
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    SKEWERS, gumdrops, and marshmallows are all that’s needed to create interesting shapes and designs for Layla McDowell Saturday at Stair District Library’s “Sculptamania!” Open House. The program featuring design games and materials is one part of a larger project funded by a $7,500 Curiosity Creates grant from Disney and the American Library Association. Additional photos are on page 7.
    Morenci marching band members took to the field Friday night dressed for Halloween during the Bulldog’s first playoff game. Morenci fans had a bit of a scare until the fourth quarter when the Bulldogs scored 30 points to leave Lenawee Christian School behind. Whiteford visits Morenci this Friday for the district championship game. From the left is Clayton Borton, Morgan Merillat and James O’Brien.
    DNA PUZZLE—Mitchell Storrs and Wyatt Mohr tackle a puzzle representing the structure of DNA. There’s only one correct way for all the pieces to fit. It’s one of the new materials that can be used in both biology and chemistry classes, said teacher Loretta Cox.
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    A TRAFFIC control worker stands in the middle of Morenci’s Main Street Tuesday morning, waiting for the next flow of vehicles to be let through from the west. The dusty gravel surface was sealed with a layer of tar, leaving only the application of paint for new striping. The project was completed in conjunction with county road commission work west of Morenci.
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    JUNIORS Jazmin Smith and Trevor Corkle struggle against a team from the sophomore class Friday during the annual tug of war at the Homecoming Games pep rally. Even the seniors struggled against the sophomores who won the competition. At the main course of the day, the Bulldog football team struggled against Whiteford in a homecoming loss.
    YOUNG soccer players surived a chilly morning Saturday in Morenci’s PTO league. From the left is Emma Cordts, Wayne Corser, Carter and Levi Seitz, Briella York and Drew Joughin. Two more weeks of soccer remain for this season.
  • Front.ropes
    BOWEN BAUMGARTNER of Morenci makes his way across a rope bridge constructed by the Tecumseh Boy Scout troop Sunday at Lake Hudson Recreation Area. The bridge was one of many challenges, displays and games set up for the annual Youth Jamboree by the Michigan DNR. Additional photos on are the back page of this week’s Observer.
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    One of four senior candidates will be crowned the fall homecoming queen during half-time of this week’s Morenci-Whiteford football game. In the back row (left to right) is exchange student Kinga Vidor (her escort will be Caylob Alcock), seniors Alli VanBrandt (escorted by Sam Cool), Larissa Elliott (escorted by Clayton Borton), Samantha Wright (escorted by JJ Elarton) and Justis McCowan (escorted by Austin Gilson), and exchange student Rebecca Rosenberger (escorted by Garrett Smith). Front row freshman court member Allie Kaiser (escorted by Anthony Thomas), sophomore Marlee Blaker (escorted by Nate Elarton) and junior Cheyenne Stone (escorted by Dominick Sell).
  • Front.park.lights
    GETTING READY—Jerad Gleckler pounds nails to secure a string of holiday lights on the side of the Wakefield Park concession stand while other members of the Volunteer Club and others hold them in place. The volunteers showed up Sunday afternoon to string lights at the park. The decorating project will continue this Sunday. Denise Walsh is in charge of the effort this year.
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Morenci Sportsmen's Club celebrates 50th 8.05.09

Written by David Green.


Members of the Morenci Sportsmen’s Club often talked about the need for a clubhouse back in the late 1950s.

Two local groups—the Seneca Sportsmen’s Club and the Morenci Conservation Club—merged a decade earlier and membership was growing.sportsmen.festival.jpg

Members met at the Powers’ house east of Gorham Street for trap shooting, but the group turned to Morenci’s Teen Inn for monthly meetings. They had no place to call their own.

On Feb. 20, 1959, club members gathered to talk about buying land for a future club house and shooting range. The first step was to approach Richard R. Carryl to see if he would sell some property northeast of town along Mulberry Road.

A deal was worked out with Carryl and at a special meeting April 16, members voted to buy 18 acres. They assessed themselves $5 each to help fund the down payment on the property.

They also planned their first smelt fry—a tradition that never took a break through the club’s first 50 years.

Members set to work on plans to remodel a barn for a clubhouse and to construct a range for trap shooting and archery, plus a picnic area. There was even talk about creating a golf driving range and a children’s play area. Right from the start, they looked at their future club as a place for the entire family to go.

The property was mostly open farm land, but there were a few trees growing along Silver Creek that wound its way through the land.

Rather than submit to a drainage project through the county, the group decided to do the work on its own. The first step was to move 23 trees. Two of them were moved very carefully—one with a dove nest and another with a nest full of robins.

Concrete picnic tables were constructed, trees were planted, and the membership grew. In fact, the Morenci Sportsmen’s Club, Inc., received an award for the best membership increase in the state.

The mortgage on the property was burned in a ceremony Aug. 7, 1969, but six years later the old clubhouse burned and fund-raising efforts were directed to paying for the new facility that was soon constructed.

The wild game supper became an annual event starting in the early 1980s. An additional seven acres of land was bought, and in 1994, an addition was constructed to enlarge the clubhouse. This made way for an indoor archery range.

Through the years, there’s been shooting of trap, skeet, clays and muzzleloaders. In the 1990s, outdoor archery began.

But don’t think only about hunting when the Sportsmen’s Club is mentioned, said member John Hanawalt.

“We work to promote our fishing and hunting heritage, but we also work for wetland preservation and for those who like to go out and watch butterflies,” he said. “We’ve got members who don’t even hunt.

“It’s not just hunting and fishing. We’re trying to keep the land for future generations.”

The club buys the Michigan United Conservation Clubs’ Tracks magazine for fifth and sixth grade students in Morenci, Sand Creek and Waldron.

“It shows what life is all about,” Hanawalt said. “It urges children to get outside and enjoy the outdoors.”

He knows it’s a valuable resource. The club has received letters of thanks from teachers and students over the years.

Club members have moved toward serving the public more by supporting the Rex Riley Scholarship effort and starting their own scholarship administered through the Morenci Education Foundation.

They direct funds to Hospice, the American Cancer Society, the Morenci ambulance service, etc., and have given money to help families who have lost possessions through a fire.

Scholarships are given to area children to attend summer camp at Cedar Lake and the group continues to rent their facility for social events.

With the 50th anniversary celebration scheduled Saturday, Hanawalt says he and other members look forward to many more years of serving the public, saving wild lands and enjoying the camaraderie of fellow sportsmen.

• Everyone in the area is welcome to join in with club members at the celebration this weekend. The annual Kids Day program begins at 10 a.m. Saturday, offering a variety of fun and educational activities at no cost.

In the evening, a family dance with a live band is planned.

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