Fayette to get its first Habitat for Humanity home 7.8.09

Written by David Green.

Excavation is expected to get underway next month for Fayette’s first Habitat for Humanity house.

Construction should begin in September, said Habitat’s Fulton County executive director Kristene Clark, in order for the building’s exterior to be completed before the arrival of cold weather.

Property for the house in the 500 block of S. Gorham Street was purchased Wednesday from Beaverson Real Estate.

The Fulton County Habitat group recently started on its twelfth home, Clark said, and a three-year goal calls for at least one home in every community.

Interest shown by Fayette residents made that community a good choice for the next project.

“We’ve had volunteers from Fayette help on the last two Habitat homes and one of the churches expressed interest in helping,” Clark said. “We felt we had the support needed in Fayette.”

In addition, a family applied for home ownership and listed Fayette as its first choice for residency.

At an informational meeting, prospective Habitat families learn about the organization and review the criteria for home ownership. A site visit is made to a family’s current residence and the Habitat board considers its need for housing before making a decision about whether or not to accept the family.

Need, ability to pay and willingness to partner are the chief criteria for the board to consider, Clark said.

A family has been accepted for the Fayette home, but not assigned since it hasn’t yet completed the requirement of 100 hours of “sweat equity” helping with other Habitat projects.

Clark said the family is very motivated and she’s not worried about its ability to complete requirements. When a family is assigned, home education and home buying courses must be completed.

Habitat for Humanity is described as a nonprofit, charitable, faith-based housing organization whose purpose is to assist in increasing production of affordable housing. The organization helps build “simple, decent and affordable houses” and provides interest-free mortgages to families that would otherwise not be able to purchase their own home.

Through donations of labor and some materials, Habitat for Humanity organizes the construction.

Clark said Fulton County was once part of the Maumee Valley (Lucas County) Habitat group but in 2007 a Fulton branch was organized.

“We started off building one house a year and increased that to two houses a year,” she said. “We have the families and the need.”

  • Front.hose Testing
    HOSE safety—The FireCatt hose testing company from Troy put Morenci Fire Department hose to the test Monday morning when Mill Street was closed to traffic. The company also checks nozzles and ladders for wear in an effort to keep fire fighters safe while on calls.
  • Front.splash
    Water Fun—Carter Seitz and Colson Walter take a fast trip along a plastic sliding strip while water from a sprinkler provides the lubrication. The boys took a break from tie-dyeing last week at Morenci’s Summer Recreation Program to cool off in the water.
  • Front.starting
    BIKE-A-THON—Children in Morenci’s Summer Recreation Program brought their bikes last Tuesday to participate in a bike-a-thon. Riders await the start of the event at the elementary school before being led on a course through town by organizer Leonie Leahy.
  • Front.drum
    on your mark, get set, drum!—Drew Joughin (black shirt), Maddox Joughin and Kaleea Braun took the front row last week when Angela Rettle and assistants led the Stair District Library Summer Reading Program kids in a session of cardio drumming. The sports and healthy living theme continued yesterday with a Mini Jamboree at Lake Hudson State Park arranged by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources. Next week’s program features the Flying Aces Frisbee show.
  • Front.art.park
    ART PARK—A design created by Poggemeyer Design Group shows a “pocket art park” in the green space south of the State Line Observer building. The proposal includes a 12-foot sculpture based on a design created by Morenci sixth grade student Klara Wesley through a school and library collaboration. A wooden band shell is located at the back of the lot. The Observer wall would be covered with a synthetic stucco material. City council members are considering ways to fund the estimated $125,000 project and perhaps tackling construction one step at a time.
  • Front.train
    WRECKAGE—Morenci Fire Department member Taylor Schisler walks past the smoking wreckage of a semi-truck tractor on the north side of the Norfolk and Southern Railroad tracks on Ranger Highway. The truck trailer was on the south side of the tracks

Weekly newspaper serving SE Michigan and NW Ohio - State Line Observer ©2006-2016