The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Front.cheers
    MACEE BEERS joins other Fayette Elementary School students for the annual Mini-Cheer performance during the half-time break at the basketball game.
  • Family.3.wide
    CHILDREN at Stair District Library’s Family Story Time toss scarves into the air during an activity. The evening program provided a mix of stories, songs, dancing, crafts and snacks Monday evening. The program is offered at 5:30 p.m. every Monday for five more weeks. The program is designed for three to five year olds and their family.
  • Front.newpaper.2
    THE INTERVIEW—Evelyn Joughin (right) records the interaction with an iPad while Jack Varga, next to her, asks questions of Morenci Elementary School principal Gail Frey. Morenci senior Sam Cool (standing) listens. Cool serves as the editor for the newspaper written by members of Mrs. Barrett’s second grade class.
  • Front.code.2
    WRITING CODE—Brock Christle (left), a Morenci fifth grade student, takes a look at the progress being made by fourth grader Anthony Lewis. Libby Rorick, a sixth grade student, is next in a line of girls trying out the coding tutorials. This year marked Morenci’s second year of participation in the Hour of Code project.
  • Front.gym.new
    REMIE RYAN (left) tries to dodge the foam wand held by Hayden Bays during physical education class at Morenci Elementary School. In the background, Lauryn Dominique and Brooklyn Williams stay clear of the tag. Second grade students were working on cardiovascular health on the first day back from vacation. For the record, Safety Tag is a very difficult sport to photograph.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.library.books
    MACK DICKSON takes a book off the “blind date” cart at the Fayette library. Patrons can choose a book without knowing what’s inside other than a general category. The books are among those designated for removal so patrons can consider them gifts. In Morenci, new books and staff favorites were chosen from the stacks and must be returned. Patrons get a piece of chocolate, too, to take on their date, but no clue about their “date.” One reader said she really enjoyed her book for a few pages, but then lost interest—so typical for a blind date.

Credit Recovery program helps students meet graduation requirements 5.20.09

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

In years past, failing a high school course wasn’t the end of the world. There was always next year when the class could be repeated.

That’s not the case anymore, not with Michigan’s new graduation requirements.

Next year’s senior class is the last to finish up before the new rules take effect. After that there will be no such thing as “next year.” With four years of mathematics and English required, students won’t have a next year to take a class over again.

Summer school was also an option in many districts, said Morenci Area High School principal Nate Parker, but that’s changing, too.

Summer school typically meant an intensive two-week session, but those abbreviated classes are falling by the wayside, also.

The only way to get the job done now is to enroll in the district’s credit recovery program via on-line courses. Districts throughout the state are moving in the same direction to help students meet the new requirements and earn a diploma.

Although several companies offer on-line courses approved by the state education department, Morenci administrators chose to go with the Arizona-based Education 2020 program.

By working through the Monroe-Lenawee ISD consortium, the district is saving a large sum of money. Each license costs $550 annually and Morenci has purchased 10 licenses. Any number of students are allowed to use the service, but only 10 at any one time are able to log in to a class.

For summer school use, students will meet with a school staff member only on the first and final day of the class. After that first day, students must work on their own until the final exam when a monitoring teacher is present.

If a student doesn’t have an internet connection at home, work will have to be done at Stair Public Library or at a friend’s house.

The classes are much different than the two-week sessions, Parker said.

“Teachers have gone through the material and are impressed,” he said.

They’re convinced students will face a rigorous challenge just as they would in a regular classroom. Success with “homework” and tests will determine advancement through the material.

With each course, the anticipated completion time is given, although that will vary with each student and how much time is devoted to the class on a daily basis.

“Some kids who struggle in the classroom will succeed with the computer version,” Parker said, but it probably won’t be the answer for everyone.

Motivation and dedication are still needed and each student will have to provide that.

Parker sees uses for the Education 2020 program beyond credit recovery. He expects the program to be used extensively in the alternative education class. State requirements have changed there, too, and a teacher must be certified for each course offered, just like in a regular classroom.

It will also be used during the school year for a student who can’t fit an essential class into his or her schedule.

The courses can also be tailored to include only a portion of a class. If a student were doing well in geometry, but couldn’t understand a particular concept, extra help could come through Education 2020.

Students will pay a fee for credit recovery summer school, but the charge has not yet been determined. Students using the program during the regular school day—or those who choose to log in for some remedial help—will not pay.

Parker looks forward to putting the program to use. Now, he says, summer school is really going to mean something.

Weekly newspaper serving SE Michigan and NW Ohio - State Line Observer ©2006-2016