The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Front.cheers
    MACEE BEERS joins other Fayette Elementary School students for the annual Mini-Cheer performance during the half-time break at the basketball game.
  • Family.3.wide
    CHILDREN at Stair District Library’s Family Story Time toss scarves into the air during an activity. The evening program provided a mix of stories, songs, dancing, crafts and snacks Monday evening. The program is offered at 5:30 p.m. every Monday for five more weeks. The program is designed for three to five year olds and their family.
  • Front.newpaper.2
    THE INTERVIEW—Evelyn Joughin (right) records the interaction with an iPad while Jack Varga, next to her, asks questions of Morenci Elementary School principal Gail Frey. Morenci senior Sam Cool (standing) listens. Cool serves as the editor for the newspaper written by members of Mrs. Barrett’s second grade class.
  • Front.code.2
    WRITING CODE—Brock Christle (left), a Morenci fifth grade student, takes a look at the progress being made by fourth grader Anthony Lewis. Libby Rorick, a sixth grade student, is next in a line of girls trying out the coding tutorials. This year marked Morenci’s second year of participation in the Hour of Code project.
  • Front.gym.new
    REMIE RYAN (left) tries to dodge the foam wand held by Hayden Bays during physical education class at Morenci Elementary School. In the background, Lauryn Dominique and Brooklyn Williams stay clear of the tag. Second grade students were working on cardiovascular health on the first day back from vacation. For the record, Safety Tag is a very difficult sport to photograph.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.library.books
    MACK DICKSON takes a book off the “blind date” cart at the Fayette library. Patrons can choose a book without knowing what’s inside other than a general category. The books are among those designated for removal so patrons can consider them gifts. In Morenci, new books and staff favorites were chosen from the stacks and must be returned. Patrons get a piece of chocolate, too, to take on their date, but no clue about their “date.” One reader said she really enjoyed her book for a few pages, but then lost interest—so typical for a blind date.

Fayette's 24-hour recycling bin 3.25.09

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

Recycling got a whole lot easier in Fayette a few months ago.

When a metal cage was installed on the east side of the village garage last summer, recycling center coordinators noticed a change.

“It’s really grown since the cage went in last summer,” said David Metcalf, who has directed Fayette’s recycling effort for years. “We seem to be picking up a few more people every month.”

Rather than wait for the once-a-month opening of the center—9 until noon on the second Saturday of the month—residents are able to drop off #1 and #2 plastics, aluminum cans and “tin” cans anytime, day or night.

Volunteers will sort the items later for transporting to the proper recycling location.

Amy Mitchell said she’s heard many good reports about the bin from community members, but there are some problems.

“There are issues that need to be addressed to make it a more effective system,” she said. “The drop-off site is for 1 and 2 plastics, aluminum and tin only.”

Glass, newspapers, magazines and cardboard should be brought in only when the center is open on the second Saturday. If left in the outdoor bin, paper products will become water-logged and glass will often break when deposited.

Volunteers have also had some problems with household trash left at the center.

Volunteers ask residents to follow these rules and suggestions:

1. Check for the triangle on the bottom of a plastic container to see if it is classified as #1 or #2. If it doesn’t have that marking, it can’t be recycled at the Fayette center and will be considered trash.

2. Bring shredded paper in a closed plastic bag.

3. Break cardboard boxes so they are flat.

4. Plastic shopping bags and egg cartons can be recycled.

5. Rinse out milk jugs well to prevent odor problems.

6. Although it is not required, sorting recyclables ahead of time helps volunteers with their work.

“We would like to thank our many faithful recyclers and those of you new to our recycling center for your part in helping our environment and our village,” Mitchell said.

Volunteers are always welcome to help out with sorting and other tasks, Metcalf said.

“If I get three or four people it really helps,” he said.

He started volunteering 12 years ago and now plays a very active role in Fayette’s recycling efforts.

Twice a week he picks up cardboard at businesses and occasionally he receives a call from someone who has a lot of material to get rid of for one reason or another. Sometimes arrangements are made to open the center during the month.

“You just pick up odd jobs when you’re retired,” he said, joking about the many hours he puts into recycling in Fayette.

In case you’re wondering if the community favors Pepsi or Coke, Dave Metcalf has the answer. He’s handled thousands of cans.

“Fayette is more of a Pepsi town,” he said.

Weekly newspaper serving SE Michigan and NW Ohio - State Line Observer ©2006-2016