Fayette's 24-hour recycling bin 3.25.09

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

Recycling got a whole lot easier in Fayette a few months ago.

When a metal cage was installed on the east side of the village garage last summer, recycling center coordinators noticed a change.

“It’s really grown since the cage went in last summer,” said David Metcalf, who has directed Fayette’s recycling effort for years. “We seem to be picking up a few more people every month.”

Rather than wait for the once-a-month opening of the center—9 until noon on the second Saturday of the month—residents are able to drop off #1 and #2 plastics, aluminum cans and “tin” cans anytime, day or night.

Volunteers will sort the items later for transporting to the proper recycling location.

Amy Mitchell said she’s heard many good reports about the bin from community members, but there are some problems.

“There are issues that need to be addressed to make it a more effective system,” she said. “The drop-off site is for 1 and 2 plastics, aluminum and tin only.”

Glass, newspapers, magazines and cardboard should be brought in only when the center is open on the second Saturday. If left in the outdoor bin, paper products will become water-logged and glass will often break when deposited.

Volunteers have also had some problems with household trash left at the center.

Volunteers ask residents to follow these rules and suggestions:

1. Check for the triangle on the bottom of a plastic container to see if it is classified as #1 or #2. If it doesn’t have that marking, it can’t be recycled at the Fayette center and will be considered trash.

2. Bring shredded paper in a closed plastic bag.

3. Break cardboard boxes so they are flat.

4. Plastic shopping bags and egg cartons can be recycled.

5. Rinse out milk jugs well to prevent odor problems.

6. Although it is not required, sorting recyclables ahead of time helps volunteers with their work.

“We would like to thank our many faithful recyclers and those of you new to our recycling center for your part in helping our environment and our village,” Mitchell said.

Volunteers are always welcome to help out with sorting and other tasks, Metcalf said.

“If I get three or four people it really helps,” he said.

He started volunteering 12 years ago and now plays a very active role in Fayette’s recycling efforts.

Twice a week he picks up cardboard at businesses and occasionally he receives a call from someone who has a lot of material to get rid of for one reason or another. Sometimes arrangements are made to open the center during the month.

“You just pick up odd jobs when you’re retired,” he said, joking about the many hours he puts into recycling in Fayette.

In case you’re wondering if the community favors Pepsi or Coke, Dave Metcalf has the answer. He’s handled thousands of cans.

“Fayette is more of a Pepsi town,” he said.

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