The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Front.cheers
    MACEE BEERS joins other Fayette Elementary School students for the annual Mini-Cheer performance during the half-time break at the basketball game.
  • Family.3.wide
    CHILDREN at Stair District Library’s Family Story Time toss scarves into the air during an activity. The evening program provided a mix of stories, songs, dancing, crafts and snacks Monday evening. The program is offered at 5:30 p.m. every Monday for five more weeks. The program is designed for three to five year olds and their family.
  • Front.newpaper.2
    THE INTERVIEW—Evelyn Joughin (right) records the interaction with an iPad while Jack Varga, next to her, asks questions of Morenci Elementary School principal Gail Frey. Morenci senior Sam Cool (standing) listens. Cool serves as the editor for the newspaper written by members of Mrs. Barrett’s second grade class.
  • Front.code.2
    WRITING CODE—Brock Christle (left), a Morenci fifth grade student, takes a look at the progress being made by fourth grader Anthony Lewis. Libby Rorick, a sixth grade student, is next in a line of girls trying out the coding tutorials. This year marked Morenci’s second year of participation in the Hour of Code project.
  • Front.gym.new
    REMIE RYAN (left) tries to dodge the foam wand held by Hayden Bays during physical education class at Morenci Elementary School. In the background, Lauryn Dominique and Brooklyn Williams stay clear of the tag. Second grade students were working on cardiovascular health on the first day back from vacation. For the record, Safety Tag is a very difficult sport to photograph.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.library.books
    MACK DICKSON takes a book off the “blind date” cart at the Fayette library. Patrons can choose a book without knowing what’s inside other than a general category. The books are among those designated for removal so patrons can consider them gifts. In Morenci, new books and staff favorites were chosen from the stacks and must be returned. Patrons get a piece of chocolate, too, to take on their date, but no clue about their “date.” One reader said she really enjoyed her book for a few pages, but then lost interest—so typical for a blind date.

Fayette's Helping Hands Food Pantry update 3.11.09

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

There’s no question about the need for a food pantry in Fayette. The challenge now is to keep the shelves stocked.

So far, that hasn’t been a problem, said Bob Yano, after the first seven weeks of operation for the Fayette Helping Hands Food Pantry. But with current economic conditions, the need to help feed isn’t likely to subside.

Looking through the statistics for February, Yano said about 200 families were helped, with about half of those families having children.

Not only has use of the pantry remained strong, but the core of volunteers needed to keep the store open has also been steady. About 25 people showed up last Thursday to help stock the shelves and clean.

Food and other goods have arrived from a variety of sources. The vast majority is purchased cheaply at the Northwest Ohio Food Bank in Toledo, but school groups and churches have sponsored food drives and individuals often leave items at the door of the pantry, located downtown in the former Gaslight Restaurant building.

Pennington Orchards has donated fruit and Dennis Farms continues to give potatoes.

“We’ve been getting a lot of meat donated lately and we’re trying to get more dairy,” Yano said.

A freezer and cooler are both available at the facility, which is owned by Don and Jane Stiriz.

Kris Keiser obtained a grant for the pantry that will bring in $1,100 in each of the next two months. Money has also come from the Fayette National Honor Society, the Lions Club and the Nazarene youth group.

Yano expects to receive many donations of fresh produce later in the summer when local gardens begin producing, and there’s been talk of planting a garden specifically for the pantry.

Unemployment figures show Fulton County with among the highest number of jobless people in the state, Yano said.

“I would expect to soon have 100 families a week near the end of the month when food stamps run out,” Yano said.

He’s sorry that the need for the pantry exists, but he’s delighted that Helping Hands came along when it did.

“Our opening was perfect,” Yano said. “I’m glad we’re here.”

Spring Drive

A special spring donation drive is now underway in conjunction with the Alan Shawn Feinstein Foundation. Yano expects to receive a portion of the $1 million designated for agencies dedicated to alleviate hunger.

The more money and food donated during this period, the more Fayette will receive from the Feinstein Foundation.

Not only does the local food pantry keep its shelves stocked with donations through April, Bob Yano said, but it also gets credit for each item through the Feinstein project.

Donations can be dropped off at the pantry on Thursdays from 1 to 5 p.m. or in canisters at the post office, school, library, bank and churches.

Donations can also be mailed to Yano at 18118 U.S. 20, Fayette, OH 45321.

 

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