Bailey Blaker's science fiction 2.4

Written by David Green.

A lesson about decomposition in Jim Bauer’s science class at Morenci Middle School led to the following essay by Bailey Blaker.
Mr. Bauer provided a list of concepts for the students to cover. He was impressed with Bailey’s descriptive story.
 

A Dying Earth

by Bailey Blaker

A rolling ominous plume of smoke rises against the crimson lit sky. A feeling of dread pulses through my veins as I continue ambling down the deserted street. Harsh voices break the cold silence, another fight has broken out. I wheeze and cough from the dust my footsteps have stirred up.blaker.bailey.jpg

Closing my eyes I try to remember what this street used to look like before the “incident,” but for the hundredth time my memory fails to come up with a decent picture. All I know is that before, this street didn’t look like it does now. The houses here are decrepit and abandoned, paint peeling on the siding. Piles of ashes stand on either side of the street, making me feel like I’m in an urn.

Bodies of the deceased litter the streets, scattered everywhere. Even the ones years old look like they died yesterday. The few scavengers that are left peck feverishly at the carcasses. Some are missing a nose here, a part of an ear there, but mostly they just lay there, whole, with the most awful expressions of their faces. Most are gasping for the oxygen they couldn’t get to in life. The sight of those bodies makes my stomach turn, but I can’t throw up because there’s nothing in my stomach anyway.

That brings me to my purpose for today. I’m starving so I’m wandering these lonely streets in search of the food I know I won’t find. Everthing’s gone—the trees, the water, the people, food, clean air—everything...gone.

It has been only 10 years since the reason for all this suffering. The first broadcast came around November. All over people ignored the news, “All the decomposers are gone.” That one sentence swept around the world overnight. None of us were sure of how or why, but everyone thought they knew who single handedly killed the planet.

At first when the news came out we thought it would be fine. Nothing had happened, months passed and some people forgot about it. That’s when the inevitable happened.

About a year after the decomposers left earth, everything turned bad. Crops were dying because there weren’t decomposers to replace nutrients into the soil. Without crops, the world’s population died in the masses. Because there was nothing to break down dead bodies and plants into simpler substances, bodies piled up all over the world. Eventually the few that were left had to burn the dead.

After a few years, oxygen went down with the number of trees. Even more people died of infection and disease than from starvation, and even more died from lack of oxygen. Now the few that have survived everything else like I have, are living the only way they can. We all are hungry, cold, tired and weak. Some of us have gone insane from the lack of human contact.

We who are left have gone back to a primitive state. Living in tribes, we hunt and pillage town after town. None of us know when this will end, but until then we will do as we have been...surviving.

Another fire burns in the distance, a tribe pillaging, I expect. I turn my back on the horizon and walk back up the street, remembering the days when the earth was covered in green.

  • Front.pokemon
    LATEST CRAZE—David Cortes (left) and Ty Kruse, along with Jerred Heselschwerdt (standing), consult their smartphones while engaging in the game of Pokémon Go. The virtual scavenger hunt comes to life when players are in the vicinity of gyms, such as Stair District Library, and PokéStops such as the fire station across the street. The boys had spent time Monday morning searching for Pokémon at Wakefield Park.
  • Front.drum
    on your mark, get set, drum!—Drew Joughin (black shirt), Maddox Joughin and Kaleea Braun took the front row last week when Angela Rettle and assistants led the Stair District Library Summer Reading Program kids in a session of cardio drumming. The sports and healthy living theme continued yesterday with a Mini Jamboree at Lake Hudson State Park arranged by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources. Next week’s program features the Flying Aces Frisbee show.
  • Girls.on.ride
    NADIYA YORK and Aniston Valentine take a spin on the Casino, one of the rides offered at Wakefield Park during Morenci’s Town and Country Festival. This year’s festival remained dry but with plenty of heat during the three-day run. Additional photographs are inside this week’s Observer.
  • Front.softball
    Angela Davis (2) and teammate Allison VanBrandt break into a jig after Morenci's softball team won its third consecutive regional title.
  • Front.art.park
    ART PARK—A design created by Poggemeyer Design Group shows a “pocket art park” in the green space south of the State Line Observer building. The proposal includes a 12-foot sculpture based on a design created by Morenci sixth grade student Klara Wesley through a school and library collaboration. A wooden band shell is located at the back of the lot. The Observer wall would be covered with a synthetic stucco material. City council members are considering ways to fund the estimated $125,000 project and perhaps tackling construction one step at a time.
  • Front.train
    WRECKAGE—Morenci Fire Department member Taylor Schisler walks past the smoking wreckage of a semi-truck tractor on the north side of the Norfolk and Southern Railroad tracks on Ranger Highway. The truck trailer was on the south side of the tracks
  • Funcolor
    LEONIE LEAHY was one of three local hair stylists who volunteered time Friday at the Morenci PTO Fun Night. Her customer, Aubrey Sandusky, looks up at her mother while her hair takes on a perfect match to her outfit. Leahy said she had a great time at the event—nothing but happy clients.
  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
  • Front.soccer.balls
    BEVY OF BALLS—Stair District Library Summer Reading Program VolunTeens, including Libby Rorick, back left and Ty Kruse, back right, threw a dozen inflatable soccer balls into the crowd during a reading of “Sergio Saves the Game.” The sports-themed program continues on Wednesdays through July 27.
  • Front.art.park
  • Front.drum
  • Shadow.salon

Weekly newspaper serving SE Michigan and NW Ohio - State Line Observer ©2006-2016