Bailey Blaker's science fiction 2.4

Written by David Green.

A lesson about decomposition in Jim Bauer’s science class at Morenci Middle School led to the following essay by Bailey Blaker.
Mr. Bauer provided a list of concepts for the students to cover. He was impressed with Bailey’s descriptive story.
 

A Dying Earth

by Bailey Blaker

A rolling ominous plume of smoke rises against the crimson lit sky. A feeling of dread pulses through my veins as I continue ambling down the deserted street. Harsh voices break the cold silence, another fight has broken out. I wheeze and cough from the dust my footsteps have stirred up.blaker.bailey.jpg

Closing my eyes I try to remember what this street used to look like before the “incident,” but for the hundredth time my memory fails to come up with a decent picture. All I know is that before, this street didn’t look like it does now. The houses here are decrepit and abandoned, paint peeling on the siding. Piles of ashes stand on either side of the street, making me feel like I’m in an urn.

Bodies of the deceased litter the streets, scattered everywhere. Even the ones years old look like they died yesterday. The few scavengers that are left peck feverishly at the carcasses. Some are missing a nose here, a part of an ear there, but mostly they just lay there, whole, with the most awful expressions of their faces. Most are gasping for the oxygen they couldn’t get to in life. The sight of those bodies makes my stomach turn, but I can’t throw up because there’s nothing in my stomach anyway.

That brings me to my purpose for today. I’m starving so I’m wandering these lonely streets in search of the food I know I won’t find. Everthing’s gone—the trees, the water, the people, food, clean air—everything...gone.

It has been only 10 years since the reason for all this suffering. The first broadcast came around November. All over people ignored the news, “All the decomposers are gone.” That one sentence swept around the world overnight. None of us were sure of how or why, but everyone thought they knew who single handedly killed the planet.

At first when the news came out we thought it would be fine. Nothing had happened, months passed and some people forgot about it. That’s when the inevitable happened.

About a year after the decomposers left earth, everything turned bad. Crops were dying because there weren’t decomposers to replace nutrients into the soil. Without crops, the world’s population died in the masses. Because there was nothing to break down dead bodies and plants into simpler substances, bodies piled up all over the world. Eventually the few that were left had to burn the dead.

After a few years, oxygen went down with the number of trees. Even more people died of infection and disease than from starvation, and even more died from lack of oxygen. Now the few that have survived everything else like I have, are living the only way they can. We all are hungry, cold, tired and weak. Some of us have gone insane from the lack of human contact.

We who are left have gone back to a primitive state. Living in tribes, we hunt and pillage town after town. None of us know when this will end, but until then we will do as we have been...surviving.

Another fire burns in the distance, a tribe pillaging, I expect. I turn my back on the horizon and walk back up the street, remembering the days when the earth was covered in green.

  • Shadow.salon
    LEARNING THE ROPES—Kristy Castillo (left), co-owner of Mane Street Salon, works with Kendal Kuhn as Sierra Orner takes a phone call. The two Morenci Area High School juniors spent Friday at the salon as part of a job shadowing experience.
  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
  • Front.winner
    REFEREE Camden Miller raises the hand of Morenci Jr. Dawgs wrestler Ryder Ryan as his opponent leaves the mat in disappointment. Morenci’s youth wrestling program served as host for a tournament Saturday morning to raise money for the club. Additional photos are on the back page.
  • Front.bank.2
    SHERWOOD STATE Bank opened its Fayette office at a grand opening Friday morning, drawing a large crowd to view the renovated building. Above, Burt Blue talks to teller Cindy Funk, while his wife, Jackie, looks around the new office. The Blues missed the opening and took a quick tour on Tuesday. Few traces remain of the former grocery store and theater, however, part of the original brick wall still shows in the hallway leading to the back of the building. The drive-through window should be ready for customers later in the month.
  • Front.carry.casket
    CARRYING—Riley Terry (blue jacket) and Mason Vaughn lead the way, carrying an empty casket outside to the hearse waiting at the curb. Morenci juniors and seniors visited Eagle Funeral Home last week to learn about the role of a funeral director and to understand the process of arranging for a funeral.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.make.three
    FROM THE LEFT, Landon Wilkins, Ryan White and Logan Blaker try out their artistic skills Saturday afternoon at the Morenci PTO’s first Date to Create event. More than 50 people showed up to create decorated planks of wood to hang from rope. The event served as a fund-raiser for miscellaneous PTO projects. Additional photos are on the back of this week’s Observer.

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