Bailey Blaker's science fiction 2.4

Written by David Green.

A lesson about decomposition in Jim Bauer’s science class at Morenci Middle School led to the following essay by Bailey Blaker.
Mr. Bauer provided a list of concepts for the students to cover. He was impressed with Bailey’s descriptive story.
 

A Dying Earth

by Bailey Blaker

A rolling ominous plume of smoke rises against the crimson lit sky. A feeling of dread pulses through my veins as I continue ambling down the deserted street. Harsh voices break the cold silence, another fight has broken out. I wheeze and cough from the dust my footsteps have stirred up.blaker.bailey.jpg

Closing my eyes I try to remember what this street used to look like before the “incident,” but for the hundredth time my memory fails to come up with a decent picture. All I know is that before, this street didn’t look like it does now. The houses here are decrepit and abandoned, paint peeling on the siding. Piles of ashes stand on either side of the street, making me feel like I’m in an urn.

Bodies of the deceased litter the streets, scattered everywhere. Even the ones years old look like they died yesterday. The few scavengers that are left peck feverishly at the carcasses. Some are missing a nose here, a part of an ear there, but mostly they just lay there, whole, with the most awful expressions of their faces. Most are gasping for the oxygen they couldn’t get to in life. The sight of those bodies makes my stomach turn, but I can’t throw up because there’s nothing in my stomach anyway.

That brings me to my purpose for today. I’m starving so I’m wandering these lonely streets in search of the food I know I won’t find. Everthing’s gone—the trees, the water, the people, food, clean air—everything...gone.

It has been only 10 years since the reason for all this suffering. The first broadcast came around November. All over people ignored the news, “All the decomposers are gone.” That one sentence swept around the world overnight. None of us were sure of how or why, but everyone thought they knew who single handedly killed the planet.

At first when the news came out we thought it would be fine. Nothing had happened, months passed and some people forgot about it. That’s when the inevitable happened.

About a year after the decomposers left earth, everything turned bad. Crops were dying because there weren’t decomposers to replace nutrients into the soil. Without crops, the world’s population died in the masses. Because there was nothing to break down dead bodies and plants into simpler substances, bodies piled up all over the world. Eventually the few that were left had to burn the dead.

After a few years, oxygen went down with the number of trees. Even more people died of infection and disease than from starvation, and even more died from lack of oxygen. Now the few that have survived everything else like I have, are living the only way they can. We all are hungry, cold, tired and weak. Some of us have gone insane from the lack of human contact.

We who are left have gone back to a primitive state. Living in tribes, we hunt and pillage town after town. None of us know when this will end, but until then we will do as we have been...surviving.

Another fire burns in the distance, a tribe pillaging, I expect. I turn my back on the horizon and walk back up the street, remembering the days when the earth was covered in green.

  • Front.tug
    MORENCI pep rallies generally end with a tug of war. The senior class entry, shown above, did not advance to the finals. Griffin Grieder, Alaina Webster, Kyle Long and Jazmin Smith are shown at the front of the rope, giving it their best effort.
  • Accident
    FAYETTE resident Patricia Stambaugh, 64, was declared dead on the scene of a single-vehicle accident Friday morning south of Morenci. Rescue units were called around 9 a.m., but as of Tuesday, law enforcement officers had not yet determined the time of the accident. According to Ohio State Highway Patrol, Stambaugh was driving west on U.S. 20 when her Chevrolet Malibu traveled off the north side of the road and down a steep embankment, coming to rest in Bean Creek (Tiffin River).
  • Athletic Fields
    SPORTS COMPLEX—Fayette’s outdoor athletic facilities will include three ball fields for summer recreation leagues at the southwest corner of the school. The baseball and softball fields, along with the running track, will be constructed on the east side of the school. Outdoor athletic fields were not part of the new school project from 2007, but voters approved a $1.4 million levy for a school addition and the sports fields last August. Both projects are scheduled to be complete by July 20.
  • Front.teacher Leading
    PRESCHOOL MUSIC—Fayette band director Jeffrey Dunford spends the last half hour of the day leading the full-day preschool class in musical activities. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.F.band
    TROMBONISTS Jake Myers (left) and Max Baker perform Friday at the annual Senior Citizens Luncheon at Fayette High School. The National Honor Society and the FFA chapter teamed up to serve a meal to area seniors and to provide musical entertainment. Both the school band and choir performed. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Station.2
    STRANGE STUFF—Morenci Elementary School students learn that blue isn’t really blue when seen through the right color of lens. Volunteer April Pike presents the lesson to students at one of the many stations brought to the school by the COSI science center. The theme of this year’s visit was the solar system.
  • Front.poles
    MOVING EAST—Utility workers continue their slow progress east along U.S. 20 south of Morenci. New electrical poles are put in place before wiring is moved into place.

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