The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Front.cheers
    MACEE BEERS joins other Fayette Elementary School students for the annual Mini-Cheer performance during the half-time break at the basketball game.
  • Family.3.wide
    CHILDREN at Stair District Library’s Family Story Time toss scarves into the air during an activity. The evening program provided a mix of stories, songs, dancing, crafts and snacks Monday evening. The program is offered at 5:30 p.m. every Monday for five more weeks. The program is designed for three to five year olds and their family.
  • Front.newpaper.2
    THE INTERVIEW—Evelyn Joughin (right) records the interaction with an iPad while Jack Varga, next to her, asks questions of Morenci Elementary School principal Gail Frey. Morenci senior Sam Cool (standing) listens. Cool serves as the editor for the newspaper written by members of Mrs. Barrett’s second grade class.
  • Front.code.2
    WRITING CODE—Brock Christle (left), a Morenci fifth grade student, takes a look at the progress being made by fourth grader Anthony Lewis. Libby Rorick, a sixth grade student, is next in a line of girls trying out the coding tutorials. This year marked Morenci’s second year of participation in the Hour of Code project.
  • Front.gym.new
    REMIE RYAN (left) tries to dodge the foam wand held by Hayden Bays during physical education class at Morenci Elementary School. In the background, Lauryn Dominique and Brooklyn Williams stay clear of the tag. Second grade students were working on cardiovascular health on the first day back from vacation. For the record, Safety Tag is a very difficult sport to photograph.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.library.books
    MACK DICKSON takes a book off the “blind date” cart at the Fayette library. Patrons can choose a book without knowing what’s inside other than a general category. The books are among those designated for removal so patrons can consider them gifts. In Morenci, new books and staff favorites were chosen from the stacks and must be returned. Patrons get a piece of chocolate, too, to take on their date, but no clue about their “date.” One reader said she really enjoyed her book for a few pages, but then lost interest—so typical for a blind date.

Fayette council OKs cuts; mayor resigns 12.31.08

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

Fayette village council members approved a budget change that will trim services to residents in 2009.

Council now has the task of getting a new mayor in place following the resignation of Anita Van Zile.

Village administrator Amy Metz heard that some citizens planned to attend the council meeting Dec. 23 to question the proposed cuts, but no one from the public was there. The budget adjustments were approved with no further discussion.

Council members intend to trim nearly $43,000 from next year’s spending plan because income tax revenue is falling short of projected levels. Cuts include the elimination of leaf and brush collection, a 50 percent reduction in water softening, and various reductions in personnel and hours worked.

A plan to save $5,000 from the pay that council members and the mayor receive ran into problems when it was learned that the change could not apply to those already serving. Council members would have to voluntarily donate their pay back to the village.

Mayor Van Zile presented a letter of resignation effective Dec. 31. She was elected to the council in 1997 and first elected mayor in 2003.

Her letter stated that she has been thinking about leaving village government due to time constraints. In addition to her job, she is earning a master’s degree and volunteers at her church.

When the village administrator position was reduced to part-time, Van Zile said her own busy schedule made it difficult to make connections with the administrator. Van Zile felt she was no longer “trying to be my best” serving as mayor.

She added, “while I recognized the diverse and controversial personalities of council while contemplating running for my second term as mayor, I was still unprepared for its affect on me. While trying to juggle the same schedule as stated above, the negative tone of council was taking its toll on me and affecting me in other areas.”

Van Zile values her experience with village government and urges other residents will step forward to serve.

“I would not trade my experiences of being elected as a council member and then running for mayor,” she said. “I would recommend to anyone to take advantage of the opportunity to serve the village, learn the system of village government, and grow deeper as a person and in commitment to the village.”

Metz was waiting to hear from the village attorney to learn about the next step in choosing a new mayor. Ordinarily, the village president (Paul Shaffer) would move into the mayor position, but his appointment as president also expires Dec. 31.

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