Fayette's Parkers Corners offers local arts and crafts 12.04.08

Written by David Green.

When Fayette’s Silver Hanger clothing store closed in the 1980s, Parkers Corners was born.

Actually, it wasn’t quite that direct, but eventually the seasonal gift shop in operation now grew from that start.

“Betty Storrs started the Christmas Craft Shop after she closed the Silver Hanger,” recalls Tom Spiess of the Fayette Fine Arts Council.

She operated the shop as a store rather than a crafts show format, and it did well.

“It was a success and grew at a nice pace,” Spiess said.

Upon Betty’s death, Ann Schang took over, but health problems derailed her participation in the store. Without a driving force, the shop closed.

That was about a decade ago, but in 2006, the shop returned under the name of Parkers Corners. According to the late Morenci historian Maude Chase, that was the original name of Fayette, named after Jared Parker.

Parker settled in the area in 1840 and served in many roles, including teacher, justice of the peace, postmaster and notary public.

Now in its third year, Parkers Corners serves as an outlet for local arts and crafts people during the Christmas season.

It’s good for the craftspeople, said Rebecca Lovelass who helps operate the store, and it’s good for local shoppers who can find unique gifts without leaving town.

The annual event is also good for the Fayette Opera House where crafters rent space for the sale.

“It builds interest in the Opera House,” Lovelass said. “It brings people in. We do really well at special events when we get new people into the Opera House.”

Events include the second Glasgow Organ Series concert Sunday afternoon.

Participation is down this year, Lovelass said, but she’s still impressed with the variety of items—and the fact that most everyone involved has a Fayette address.

New to the sale this year is work by Dustin and Tania Glass who created detailed hardwood replicas of trucks and tractors.

Jewelry made by Phyllis Johnson is also in the sale for the first time.

Among the other items are baskets woven by Cinda Metcalf, tin items crafted by Michael Runyon, brooms made by Jonah Runyon, soaps made by Shelly McNutt, benches created by Trina Stambaugh from old doors, crochet and knit items by Jane Durham, lamps made from old candlesticks created by Cindy Creek and feather fans made by Lovelass.

There are also jellies, Christmas tree ornaments and stockings, candies and more. A selection of wreaths will arrive soon.

Regular hours are scheduled from 2 to 6 p.m. on Fridays and 9 a.m. to noon on Saturdays. In addition to hours Sunday during the Glasgow Series show, the shop will open during the Dec. 13 hand bell performance, beginning at 7:30 p.m., and also from 5 to 7 p.m. Saturday during the “Christmas in Fayette” event.

The shop can also be opened by appointment by calling 419/237-3091. Parkers Corners will remain open through Dec. 20.

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