Fayette village council 10.29.08

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

A sewer line from Riviera Mobile Court to Fayette’s treatment center received final approval by village council members Thursday, but not by much.

Councilors voted 3-2 to approve a resolution to accept sewage from the mobile home court, with Craig Rower and Jerry Gonzales opposing the request. Paul Shaffer was absent from the meeting.

Rower and Gonzales stated their opposition in past discussions, charging that public funds will be used to pay for a private project.

The mobile home court is owned by Clemenson Investments, but the sewer line will be owned by the county because federal CDBG funds can only be used for public projects.

A pump house and 2,000-foot forced main will be built to comply with an Ohio EPA directive to either upgrade the system at the court or connect with the village system. The line will serve 15 units at the court and sewage output is not to exceed an average of 15,000 gallons a day. The project will cost about $100,000.

Fulton County Engineer Ziad Musallam expects the project to get underway this fall, pending final approval by the Ohio EPA.

The funds were earmarked for a low-income project and Riviera is one of two areas in the county where the money could be used.

In the past, council members have expressed concern about capacity issues with the village treatment system, especially with the elementary school joining the system at the new building. Mussallam has assured the village that sufficient capacity exists.

SIDEWALKS—Village administrator Amy Metz learned earlier this month the School Travel Plan was approved by the Ohio Department of Transportation.

State approval was the first step in seeking a Safe Routes to School grant that would provide funding for sidewalk repair and installation.

Council members approved a resolution Thursday, clearing the way for the application process.

If the village were to obtain the grant, an enhancement fee of $2.50 a quarter for all property owners would kick in to help pay the village’s matching share for sidewalk work.

Metz said that hopes for a $75,000 sidewalk through the Healthy Ohio program have been diminished. She learned recently that funding for the program will be reduced.

LEAVES—Leaf pickup by village workers continues every Monday, but residents are reminded that leaves should not be raked into the street.

RECYCLING—A bin has been placed on the east side of the village barn to accept plastic, glass and tin cans when the recycling center is not open. Paper should not be placed in the bin.

Metz praised Dave Metcalf for the work he does at the center. Money raised from the center is given to the park fund.

FIRE TRUCK—Liability insurance for the old REO fire truck costs $353 annually. The finance committee will continue to investigate selling the vehicle.

PROJECT PRIDE—Metz spoke about misconceptions that some residents have about the “Project Pride” neighborhood meetings.

She described the meetings as opportunities to meet with neighbors to offer suggestions for community improvement and awareness. The meetings do not serve as a means for the village to collect information about residents not following regulations.

Misconceptions, she said, are keeping some people from attending.

GENTER—County commissioner Dean Genter spoke to council members about his bid for reëlection to a third term.

He said the commissioners continue to look for ways to trim expenses and improve efficiency in the county services. He noted that no tax increase has come from the county since 1987, but he said that an increase will inevitably come some time in the future to meet funding challenges.

Genter said that, if returned to office, he intends to travel to Washington, D.C., with other commissioners to visit elected officials to seek financial help.

Councilor Gonzales said that efforts should be made to lower taxes rather than give grants. He said he doesn’t want federal funds for Fayette’s sewer projects; instead, he urged Genter to get the Ohio EPA off the village’s back.

Genter commented on the village’s water resources and spoke of his desire to have Fayette water sold to Lyons and Metamora through a water line that the county could construct. Lyons currently obtains water from Wauseon.

Genter also spoke critically of electrical rates in the county, calling them a detriment to development.

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