Fayette village council 10.1

Written by David Green.


Although the final approval is yet to come for the Riviera Mobile Court sewer project, Fayette village council members are moving forward with their support.

Council heard the first reading Thursday of a service agreement listed as an addendum to the existing sewage contract with Camp Palmer.

Fulton County Engineer Ziad Musallam expects the project to get underway this fall.

“The funding would not be finalized until the Ohio EPA permit to install is issued,” he said. “We should have the permit within a month and the construction could start anytime afterward.”

A pump house and 2,000-foot forced main will be built to comply with an Ohio EPA directive to either upgrade the system at the court or connect with the village system. The line will serve 15 units at the court and sewage output is not to exceed an average of 15,000 gallons a day.

The court is owned by Clemenson Investments, but the sewer line will be owned by the county because federal CDBG funds can only be used for public projects.

DEMOLITION—Anyone intending to demolish a building in Fayette will now have to first obtain a permit. The ordinance was passed by a 4-0 vote, with council members Craig Rower and Mike Maginn absent.

Permit fees are $30 for an accessory building, $150 for a house and $3 per 100 square feet for a commercial building.

Permit fees will go into the village general fund and help offset costs incurred when village employees are needed to disconnect water and sewer lines and clean a street of demolition debris.

HOUSE—Council members sent a letter to the Fulton County Health Center, owner of the former Nyce residence on Gorham Street, to express their opposition to the proposed demolition of the house for expanded parking at the Fayette Medical Center.

METALS—In light of the nationwide economic crisis, Gonzales suggested buying precious metals and storing them in safety deposit boxes.

“It’s very non-traditional,” he said, “but banks are almost as risky as the stock market.”

He suggested that a council committee should investigate the option.

LEAVES—Leaf pickups are scheduled to begin Oct. 13 and continue every Monday through the first Monday in December, weather permitting.

Scheduled brush collection has stopped for the year, but one additional run might take place in December if weather permits.

Residents are encouraged to take brush to the designated area at the village barn.

LICENSE—No action was taken on a request to send village worker Tom Rupp for training to obtain a water system license. Classes would have cost $570 plus lodging and fuel. With the license, Rupp could have served as a backup operator to Bob Seigneur. Approval was needed quickly in order to register for the course.

“I don’t see the need,” councilor Jerry Gonzales said. “I think it’s a waste of money.”

Gonzales said Rupp already has a license to serve as a sewage treatment system operator. He gets extra pay since he has the license, Gonzales said, but the village gets nothing in return.

If the village were flush with cash, councilor Ruth Marlatt said, it would be good to have a backup. Rather than make rushed decision,  she said, finances should first be checked.

  • Front.poles
    MOVING EAST—Utility workers continue their slow progress east along U.S. 20 south of Morenci. New electrical poles are put in place before wiring is moved into place.
  • Front.cowboy
    A PERFORMER named Biligbaatar, a member of the AnDa Union troupe from Inner Mongolia, dances at Stair District Library last week during a visit to the Midwest. The nine-member group blends a variety of traditions from Inner and Outer Mongolia. The music is described as drawing from “all the Mongol tribes that Genghis Khan unified.” The group considers itself music gatherers whose goal is to preserve traditional sounds of Mongolia. Biligbaatar grew up among traditional herders who live in yurts. Additional photos are on the back page of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.base Ball
    UMPIRE Thomas Henthorn tosses the bat between team captains Mikayla Price and Chuck Piskoti of Flint’s Lumber City Base Ball Club. Following the 1860 rules, after the bat was grabbed by the captains, captains’ hands advanced to the top of the bat—one hand on top of the other. The captain whose hand ended up on top decided who would bat first. Additional photos of Sunday’s game appear on page 12 of this week’s Observer. The contest was organized in conjunction with Stair District Library’s Hometown Teams exhibit that runs through Nov. 20.
  • Front.chat
    VALUE OF ATHLETICS—Morenci graduate John Bancroft (center) takes a turn at the microphone during a chat session at the opening of the Hometown Teams exhibit at Stair District Library. Clockwise to his left is John Dillon, Jed Hall, Jim Bauer, Joe Farquhar, George Hollstein, George Vereecke and Mike McDowell. Thomas Henthorn (at the podium) kicked off the conversation. Henthorn, a University of Michigan–Flint professor, will return to Morenci this Sunday to lead a game of vintage base ball at the school softball field.
  • Front.cross
    HUDSON RUNNER Jacob Morgan looks toward the top of the hill with dismay during the tough finish at Harrison Lake State Park. Fayette runner Jacob Garrow focuses on the summit, also, during the Eagle Invitational cross country run Saturday morning. Continuing rain and drizzle made the course even more challenging. Results of the race are in this week’s Observer.
  • Front.bear
    HOLDEN HUTCHISON gives a hug to a black bear cub—the product of a taxidermist’s skills—at the Michigan DNR’s Great Youth Jamboree. The event on Sunday marked the fourth year of the Jamboree. Additional photos are on page 12.
  • Front.hose Testing
    HOSE safety—The FireCatt hose testing company from Troy put Morenci Fire Department hose to the test Monday morning when Mill Street was closed to traffic. The company also checks nozzles and ladders for wear in an effort to keep fire fighters safe while on calls.

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