The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Front.cheers
    MACEE BEERS joins other Fayette Elementary School students for the annual Mini-Cheer performance during the half-time break at the basketball game.
  • Family.3.wide
    CHILDREN at Stair District Library’s Family Story Time toss scarves into the air during an activity. The evening program provided a mix of stories, songs, dancing, crafts and snacks Monday evening. The program is offered at 5:30 p.m. every Monday for five more weeks. The program is designed for three to five year olds and their family.
  • Front.newpaper.2
    THE INTERVIEW—Evelyn Joughin (right) records the interaction with an iPad while Jack Varga, next to her, asks questions of Morenci Elementary School principal Gail Frey. Morenci senior Sam Cool (standing) listens. Cool serves as the editor for the newspaper written by members of Mrs. Barrett’s second grade class.
  • Front.code.2
    WRITING CODE—Brock Christle (left), a Morenci fifth grade student, takes a look at the progress being made by fourth grader Anthony Lewis. Libby Rorick, a sixth grade student, is next in a line of girls trying out the coding tutorials. This year marked Morenci’s second year of participation in the Hour of Code project.
  • Front.skelton.vigil
    MORENCI’S three Skelton brothers were remembered with both tears and laughter last week during a candlelight vigil at Wakefield Park. Several people came out of the crowd to give their recollection of the boys who have now been missing for five years.
  • Front.gym.new
    REMIE RYAN (left) tries to dodge the foam wand held by Hayden Bays during physical education class at Morenci Elementary School. In the background, Lauryn Dominique and Brooklyn Williams stay clear of the tag. Second grade students were working on cardiovascular health on the first day back from vacation. For the record, Safety Tag is a very difficult sport to photograph.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.

175 years of fighting fires 10.1

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

“It’s like having a whole other family.”

“I enjoy being part of the family that is formed in the fire department.”

“Working alongside my son.

”I got to work alongside my dad and brother.”

Family is word that comes up often when you speak to volunteer firefighters.

There’s the extended family that’s grows among the members; there’s the family they often leave behind for training and for emergencies.

“You have to have support from your family,” said 38-year veteran David Lonis of the Morenci Fire Department.

Initially, that’s from the 266 hours of training required to become a full-fledged department member. Then there’s the required monthly training and the monthly equipment checks.

There’s optional advanced training, such as heavy duty truck extrication, flash-over fire suppression techniques and rapid intervention team techniques (RIT).

There are annual fire hydrant checks and community relation projects such as Fire Safety Week.

And then there are the times that all the training is designed for—leaving the comfort of a warm bed or leaving the family on a Saturday afternoon to fight a fire.

The time demands are huge, Lonis said, but that’s part of what brings the volunteers together to create the fire department family—a family that often includes brothers, fathers and sons.

History

The history of fighting fires in Morenci mirrors the history of the community, dating back to the early bucket brigades when the village was settled in 1833.

Nearly 40 years later, the first organized volunteer department—the forerunner of today’s department—was formed, named Hook & Ladder Company #1.

At that time, joining the department was a popular thing to do, with 75 members on the roster. The first floor of the new city hall was designated as a place to store the new human-powered fire truck, known as Sitting Bull, plus the truck and hose cart.

The first motorized truck was purchased in 1914, followed by a second unit 10 years later. In 1934, a Dodge joined the department and that unit still serves as a parade unit.

Since then, pumpers, a tanker, brush units and a heavy rescue unit have joined the fleet.

In 1986, the department moved out of the old city hall building and into a new building on the south side of Main Street.

Satisfaction

It’s not only the camaraderie the department members enjoy. The statements at the beginning of the story were written by department members during the recent series in the Observer highlighting members.

They also spoke about the satisfaction that comes with doing their job.

“Helping friends when they need help.”

“The satisfaction of knowing we made a difference.”

“The adrenaline rush and leadership that takes place when it is needed the most.”

Morenci’s department members will continue to train and prepare for the next emergency—just like dozens of volunteers over the past 175 years.

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