The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
  • Front.winner
    REFEREE Camden Miller raises the hand of Morenci Jr. Dawgs wrestler Ryder Ryan as his opponent leaves the mat in disappointment. Morenci’s youth wrestling program served as host for a tournament Saturday morning to raise money for the club. Additional photos are on the back page.
  • Front.bank.2
    SHERWOOD STATE Bank opened its Fayette office at a grand opening Friday morning, drawing a large crowd to view the renovated building. Above, Burt Blue talks to teller Cindy Funk, while his wife, Jackie, looks around the new office. The Blues missed the opening and took a quick tour on Tuesday. Few traces remain of the former grocery store and theater, however, part of the original brick wall still shows in the hallway leading to the back of the building. The drive-through window should be ready for customers later in the month.
  • Front.carry.casket
    CARRYING—Riley Terry (blue jacket) and Mason Vaughn lead the way, carrying an empty casket outside to the hearse waiting at the curb. Morenci juniors and seniors visited Eagle Funeral Home last week to learn about the role of a funeral director and to understand the process of arranging for a funeral.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.make.three
    FROM THE LEFT, Landon Wilkins, Ryan White and Logan Blaker try out their artistic skills Saturday afternoon at the Morenci PTO’s first Date to Create event. More than 50 people showed up to create decorated planks of wood to hang from rope. The event served as a fund-raiser for miscellaneous PTO projects. Additional photos are on the back of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.F.office
    NEW OFFICES—Fayette village administrator Steve Blue speaks with tax administrator Genna Biddix at the new front desk of the village office. Village council members voted to use budgeted renovation funds targeted for the old office and instead buy the vacant bank building on the corner of Main and Fayette streets. The old office was sold to Sherwood State Bank. When everything is put into place in the spacious new village office, an open house will be scheduled. Council member David Wheeler donated all of his time needed to make changes in the bank interior to fit the Village’s needs.

Gardening Q & A from MSU Extension

Written by David Green.

The outdoor gardening season may be winding down, but questions about growing plants are always in season. Michigan State University Extension specialists answer timely questions about landscape ornamentals, vegetable gardening, familiar insects and related topics.

Q.  In a stand of goldenrod stems I noticed quite a few that looked as if they’d grown around a marble. What causes this?

A.  The marble is actually a plant gall – plant tissue that forms in response to injury by insects or mites, bacteria, viruses, nematodes, or chemical or mechanical irritants. In the case of the goldenrod stem, the gall formed when a tiny insect inserted its egg into the stem. Ice anglers have been known to harvest the larvae inside the galls for bait.

Q.  I grew luffa sponge gourds for the first time this year. They’re maturing nicely, but I don’t know when to harvest them or what to do with them after that.

A.  Allow the gourds to mature on the vine. After vines are killed by frost, soak the gourds in water until the outer covering and interior pith soften. Then rub the gourds together or use a brush to remove the soft tissue. What’s left is the luffa sponge. Wash the sponge several times in clear water and let it dry. It’s then ready for use.

Q.  What does the banded woolly bear caterpillar turn into? I’m guessing it’s some kind of moth.

A.  The woolly bear (or woolly worm) – black on the ends and rusty brown in the middle -- is frequently seen crossing roads in the fall. After over-wintering in the larval stage, it will pupate and turn into an Isabella tiger moth. The adult moth has a wingspan of 1.8 to 2.6 inches and ranges in color from dull yellow to orange with scattered small dark spots. The underwings may be white, yellowish or orange, and the head is small and the thorax (the body segment directly behind the head) is hairy.                                                         

Q.  What is a dwarf conifer?

A.  A dwarf conifer is a variation on a species of pine, hemlock, fir, spruce or other conifer that never attains the height of the original species. “Dwarf” is a relative term – a 15-foot plant may be a dwarf if the original parent species typically tops 60 feet, for instance. Dwarf conifers usually grow slowly. They may vary from the species in form and color as well as height.

Q.  What sort of care do rhododendrons need to survive a northern winter?

A.  Keep plants well-watered through the fall so that they enter winter with plenty of moisture in their tissues. Rhododendrons hold their foliage through the winter, so they continue to lose moisture even after the ground is frozen and their roots can no longer take up water to replace what is lost. Make sure plants are surrounded by several inches of an organic mulch such as ground bark, wood chips or pine needles. Spray with an antidesiccant to seal moisture inside the foliage and stems. Build a windbreak out of burlap fastened to wooden stakes placed around the plant to protect plants, especially those in exposed locations, against drying winter winds.

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