Fayette council 8.20

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

Fayette village council approved a set of sidewalk specifications Thursday—a step needed in order to apply for grants to aid sidewalk construction.

The ordinance describes policy for the construction, reconstruction, repair and maintenance of sidewalks.

Walks are to be inspected annually by the village administrator or someone appointed for the job. If a complaint is received about a sidewalk, an inspection must be made within 48 hours.

Hazards include misaligned slabs greater than one inch, gaps between slabs greater than an inch, the excessive slope of slab, excessive cracks and pits, and obstructions such as shrubbery and trees that prohibit the use of a sidewalk.

Repair or installation requires a $20 zoning permit that will be refunded if the work passes inspection.

Sidewalks shall be four feet wide and four inches thick. Control joints shall not exceed five feet. Other details are available by reading the ordinance at the village office.

Once a sidewalk is inspected, a property owner will have 60 days to repair a non-compliant walk, either by hiring a contractor on their own or using a third party arranged by the village. If the work is not done within 60 days, the village will have the work done and bill the property owner.

The property owner has the option of paying the cost in a lump sum, requesting payments via water and sewer billing or having the cost placed on the property assessment.

The ordinance also includes an enhancement fee—set by council at $2.50 a quarter for all property—that will be assessed only if funding is received through the Healthy Ohio or Safe Routes to School programs. The fee would contribute to the village’s matching share with the grant programs.

The ordinance also guarantees replacement by the village if a sidewalk is damaged due to maintenance or repair of water or sewer lines or other infrastructure work.

SUPPORT—Letters of support from individuals and organizations are needed for the village’s effort to obtain the Healthy Ohio Community Obesity Prevention Grant. Letters should address how new sidewalks will benefit the village. Information sheets are available at the village office and the library.

WEBSITE—Council voted to have the village website moved to A Mark Above hosting service from Archbold. The annual fee is less than the current service and there’s a possibility of local businesses and organizations adding a web page to the site for a nominal fee.

SEWER/WATER—Councilors gave village administrator Amy Metz permission to apply for funding through the Ohio Public Works Commission for work on West Industrial Parkway. Grants or low-interest loans would total $83,000 and the village would contribute $28,000.

The project includes a new lift station and sewer line to connect to the existing system, plus a parallel water line to better serve the northwest section of the village. The new lines would prepare the area for future development.

FIRE TRUCK—Council approved the sale of the 1974 Ford “tele-squirt” fire truck to Gorham Township at a cost of $7,000.

SPRING CREEK—After consulting with Fulton County Engineer Frank Onweller, council learned that cleaning and dredging of Spring Creek through the village would have to be done at the village’s expense.

PHYSICIAN SEARCH—Three physicians have expressed an interest in serving as family practitioners in Fayette.

LAWN CARE—An amendment to the lawn maintenance ordinance was approved. A sign will be placed in the yard of property owners who are not complying with the maintenance ordinance. The sign must be returned to the village office in good condition or a $500 fine will be assessed.

EAGLE STREET—Metz reported that the final cost of the washout repair on Eagle Street was about $8,500 which is more than $3,000 under the estimated cost.

THANKS—Thanks were expressed to the Bull Thistle Committee members and others involved in helping with a successful festival.

Paul Shaffer noted that Tom Franks spends several hours overseeing the fireworks set-up on festival day before setting up sound equipment for music.

  • Front.nok Hok
    GAMES DAY—Finn Molitierno (right) celebrates a goal during a game of Nok Hockey with his sister, Kyla. The two tried out a variety of games Saturday at Stair District Library’s annual International Games Day event. One of the activities featured a sort of scavenger hunt in which participants had to locate facts presented in the Smithsonian Hometown Teams exhibit. The traveling show left Morenci’s library Tuesday, wrapping up a series of programs that began Oct. 2. Additional photos are on page 7.
  • Station.2
    STRANGE STUFF—Morenci Elementary School students learn that blue isn’t really blue when seen through the right color of lens. Volunteer April Pike presents the lesson to students at one of the many stations brought to the school by the COSI science center. The theme of this year’s visit was the solar system.
  • Front.leaves
    MAPLE leaves show their fall colors in a puddle at Morenci’s Riverside Natural Area. “This was a great year for colors,” said local weather watcher George Isobar. Chilly mornings will give way to seasonable fall temperatures for the next two weeks.
  • Front.band
    MORENCI Marching Band member Brittany Dennis keeps the beat Friday during the half-time show of the Morenci/Pittsford football game. Color guard member Jordan Cordts is at the left. The band performed this season under the direction of Doyle Rodenbeck who served as Morenci’s band director in the 1970s. He’s serving as a substitute during a family leave.
  • Front.poles
    MOVING EAST—Utility workers continue their slow progress east along U.S. 20 south of Morenci. New electrical poles are put in place before wiring is moved into place.
  • Front.cowboy
    A PERFORMER named Biligbaatar, a member of the AnDa Union troupe from Inner Mongolia, dances at Stair District Library last week during a visit to the Midwest. The nine-member group blends a variety of traditions from Inner and Outer Mongolia. The music is described as drawing from “all the Mongol tribes that Genghis Khan unified.” The group considers itself music gatherers whose goal is to preserve traditional sounds of Mongolia. Biligbaatar grew up among traditional herders who live in yurts. Additional photos are on the back page of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.bear
    HOLDEN HUTCHISON gives a hug to a black bear cub—the product of a taxidermist’s skills—at the Michigan DNR’s Great Youth Jamboree. The event on Sunday marked the fourth year of the Jamboree. Additional photos are on page 12.

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