Dedication is Sunday for Fayette school 8.13

Written by David Green.

Gorham Fayette school district residents have watched the progress for months and months. Now the wait is nearly over. District residents will finally have a look at their new K-12 school building Sunday afternoon.

Ground was broken almost exactly two years ago in a farm field south of Gamble Road. This time the ceremony is planned in the new gymnasium when the facility is unveiled and dedicated.

Superintendent Russell Griggs will welcome guests at 2 p.m. Sunday, followed by remarks from board of education president Paula Schaffner.

Board vice president David Brinegar will introduce other board members before Supt. Griggs returns to the podium to introduce the guest speaker, State Rep. Bruce Goodwin.

The school band will play two selections during the ceremony.

Griggs says the facility will usher in “a new era of education” for Fayette area children. Collecting and processing information is done in ways different from even a decade ago and many technological advances are incorporated into the new facility.

A computer lab and mobile computer cart will be bolstered by four computers in each classroom for student use. Teachers will take advantage of interactive white boards (“smart boards”), in addition to audio visual and telecommunications equipment incorporated into each classroom.

The $18.2 million project was largely funded through the Ohio Schools Facilities Commission (OSFC) that funnels tobacco settlement money into school construction projects.

The OSFC contributed $13.6 million, leaving district voters to pay $4.6 million. In 2005, district residents approved a 7.6 mill bond issue by a vote of 438-306. The millage rate includes a required half mill that’s set aside for maintenance of the facility.

The owner of a $75,000 home pays about $194 a year.

The 60 acre parcel of land leaves space for future athletic fields and for crops planted by the agricultural science classes.

Rooms are arranged with the regular academic classrooms clustered at the front of the school—elementary on one side, secondary on the other. Other subjects, such as art, music, life skills and vocational agriculture, are taught in rooms farther back in the structure.

Administrative offices are located in front of the school, between the two academic wings.

The large high school gymnasium and the smaller elementary gymnasium are at the back.

Fayette’s old high school was constructed in 1929, with additions built in 1953, 1973 and 1997. The elementary school, located in Zone, was built in 1937 and a classroom addition was constructed in 1958.

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