Morenci 1st Congregational observing 150th 8.13

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

The year 1858 was an important one in American history. As the nation’s second gold rush got underway, Fifty-Niners began streaming into the Rocky Mountains, just a decade after the massive surge into California—Pike’s Peak or Bust.

Charles Darwin announced his theory of evolution and the first trans-Atlantic telegraph cable connected the United States and Great Britain. A contingent of pro-slavery forces committed a massacre in the Bleeding Kansas incident, and three months later, the series of Lincoln-Douglas debates got underway.

In Morenci—a young community only 25 years old—1858 was an important year for a couple dozen residents. Many of them were making the long trek by horse and buggy to Medina for services at a Congregational church.

A decision was made to start a church in Morenci and a council of ministers and delegates was called on March 17. By the end of the day, the deed was done. The First Congregational Church of Morenci had become a reality.

The church covenant started with these words: “We are banded together as a Christian Church to maintain the worship of God, to proclaim the gospel of Christ, to develop in men a consciousness of their relations and duties to God and their fellow men, and to inspire in them with love for truth, passion for righteousness, and enthusiasm for service.”

Members met in other churches and buildings for 13 years until construction  of a church building began in 1871. The interior layout then was much different than what worshippers see today.

Buggies pulled up to a wooden platform on the west side. Passengers disembarked and entered the church through the gothic doors on the south, on Locust Street.

The pews faced north, just the opposite of today’s arrangement, however, a choir platform was in place where it stands today. The congregation turned and faced the choir when hymns were sung.

In 1923, church members voted to remodel the interior and at that time the pews were turned to face the south. A balcony was built and a new entrance was constructed along Summit Street. A new pipe organ was also installed.

In 1955, when the organ was in need of repair and interest was expressed in making it powered by electricity, Dr. and Mrs. James Blanchard bought a Hammond electric organ to replace the pipe organ.

The congregation approved a major building project in 1961 that added a large meeting area, education rooms, an office and a kitchen.

In the church narthex, or entryway, the original pewter Communion service is displayed in a case, along with other memorabilia from the past.

In 1957, the Congregational Christian Churches joined with the Evangelical and Reformed Church to form the United Church of Christ. Morenci’s church joined the union in 1961 and remained for four decades. In 2001. members voted to return to the National Association of Christian Congregational Churches.

Celebration

A 150th anniversary service is planned at 10 a.m. Sunday. Dr. Jack Cahill, Morenci pastor, will present a message highlighting many years of church service.

Special music will be presented by church organist Sybil Diccion and former member Sylvia Sims will present a vocal solo. Former choir members will be invited to join together to sing two hymns and piano solos will be presented by Chloe and Kyla Molitierno.

Invitations were sent to many former church members and more than 120 present members and guests are expected for the special service and luncheon.

Historical items and photographs will be on display and guests will have the opportunity to reminisce.

  • Front.geese
    ON THE MOVE—Six goslings head out on manuevers with their parents in an area lake. Baby waterfowl are showing up in lakes and ponds throughout the area.
  • Front.little Ball
    Fayette's Demetrious Whiteside (left)Skylar Lester attempt to keep the ball from going out of bounds during Morenci's recent basketball tournament for fourth and fifth grade teams. Morenci's Andrew Schmidt stands by.
  • Front.tug
    MORENCI pep rallies generally end with a tug of war. The senior class entry, shown above, did not advance to the finals. Griffin Grieder, Alaina Webster, Kyle Long and Jazmin Smith are shown at the front of the rope, giving it their best effort.
  • Accident
    FAYETTE resident Patricia Stambaugh, 64, was declared dead on the scene of a single-vehicle accident Friday morning south of Morenci. Rescue units were called around 9 a.m., but as of Tuesday, law enforcement officers had not yet determined the time of the accident. According to Ohio State Highway Patrol, Stambaugh was driving west on U.S. 20 when her Chevrolet Malibu traveled off the north side of the road and down a steep embankment, coming to rest in Bean Creek (Tiffin River).
  • Athletic Fields
    SPORTS COMPLEX—Fayette’s outdoor athletic facilities will include three ball fields for summer recreation leagues at the southwest corner of the school. The baseball and softball fields, along with the running track, will be constructed on the east side of the school. Outdoor athletic fields were not part of the new school project from 2007, but voters approved a $1.4 million levy for a school addition and the sports fields last August. Both projects are scheduled to be complete by July 20.
  • Front.teacher Leading
    PRESCHOOL MUSIC—Fayette band director Jeffrey Dunford spends the last half hour of the day leading the full-day preschool class in musical activities. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.F.band
    TROMBONISTS Jake Myers (left) and Max Baker perform Friday at the annual Senior Citizens Luncheon at Fayette High School. The National Honor Society and the FFA chapter teamed up to serve a meal to area seniors and to provide musical entertainment. Both the school band and choir performed. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.poles
    MOVING EAST—Utility workers continue their slow progress east along U.S. 20 south of Morenci. New electrical poles are put in place before wiring is moved into place.

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