Fayette village council 8.6

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEEN

Fayette has nearly 2.8 miles of good sidewalk in the village and an additional 10 miles of either substandard walk or no walk at all.

That’s what a recent survey of village streets determined, pointing out that more than 75 percent of the town is without usable sidewalks.

“The community has voiced a lot of concern about sidewalks,” village administrator Amy Metz said at the July 28 council meeting.

People have volunteered to provide labor to build sidewalks, she added.

In addition to some free labor, the village might also get some financial assistance through a pair of grant programs.

Audra Roesti, a cardiovascular health educator with the Fulton County Health Department, told council members about a grant program through the Healthy Ohio organization that could bring in up to $75,000, including a 10 percent match from the village. The village contribution could include labor.

The funds originate with the Ohio Department of Health and the grant request must be filed through the county health department.

Roesti suggested the village apply through a “targeted environmental change to enhance physical activity.” In this case, good sidewalks would encourage more physical activity for town residents.

Roesti presented information about the physical state of Ohio residents—35 percent overweight, 28 percent obese—and pointed out that the lack of physical activity is a contributing factor. This often leads to cardiovascular health issues.

Roesti would like to include her grant request with an application to the Safe Routes to School program that could bring in funds for sidewalk repair and installation.

Metz told councilors that a cost estimate to install and repair walks throughout the village was pegged at $588,000, based on an estimated cost of $11 a running foot for a four-foot wide walk. A contingency fee of $58,800 would cover other costs, such as removing trees and adding an aggregate base, where necessary.

The estimate also doesn’t include the removal of old walks that need replacement.

Council member Ruth Marlatt asked if the Healthy Ohio grant is renewable, since it would fund only a small portion of the work needed.

There are no guarantees, Roesti said, but her intent would be to make it renewable.

Community support for the project would increase Fayette’s chances of obtaining a grant, she said. For example, churches might pledge support to be responsible for the walks along their property, and service groups could make a financial pledge.

Council members gave Roesti permission to apply for the grant and also approved a recommendation from the Public Safety committee to create an ordinance for a sidewalk enhancement fee.

A fee of $2.50 a quarter would bring in about $5,000 a year, said committee member Jerry Gonzales, to be placed into a fund to cover the village’s 10 percent contribution to the grant program. Gonzales wants the fee contingent on receiving the grant.

The fund would allow the sidewalk project to continue year after year, said councilor Paul Shaffer.

In other sidewalk news, the village repaired walks that were damaged from waterline repair.

SEWER REPAIR—Councilors voted 4-2 to approve the repair of a sewer line on Eagle Street that washed out during a heavy rain in early July.

Council accepted a bid from Armstrong Excavating for the repair work, not to exceed $6,000, and for the purchase of aggregate materials from Custar Stone, not to exceed $6,200.

Armstrong’s bid was the lower of two received, but Craig Rower and Paul Shaffer voted against the measure.

Rower explained later that he would have preferred that three bids were taken instead of two. Shaffer said he was opposed to the motion because the work was already completed by the time council voted on the issue. He also would have preferred three bids.

  • Front.nok Hok
    GAMES DAY—Finn Molitierno (right) celebrates a goal during a game of Nok Hockey with his sister, Kyla. The two tried out a variety of games Saturday at Stair District Library’s annual International Games Day event. One of the activities featured a sort of scavenger hunt in which participants had to locate facts presented in the Smithsonian Hometown Teams exhibit. The traveling show left Morenci’s library Tuesday, wrapping up a series of programs that began Oct. 2. Additional photos are on page 7.
  • Station.2
    STRANGE STUFF—Morenci Elementary School students learn that blue isn’t really blue when seen through the right color of lens. Volunteer April Pike presents the lesson to students at one of the many stations brought to the school by the COSI science center. The theme of this year’s visit was the solar system.
  • Front.leaves
    MAPLE leaves show their fall colors in a puddle at Morenci’s Riverside Natural Area. “This was a great year for colors,” said local weather watcher George Isobar. Chilly mornings will give way to seasonable fall temperatures for the next two weeks.
  • Front.band
    MORENCI Marching Band member Brittany Dennis keeps the beat Friday during the half-time show of the Morenci/Pittsford football game. Color guard member Jordan Cordts is at the left. The band performed this season under the direction of Doyle Rodenbeck who served as Morenci’s band director in the 1970s. He’s serving as a substitute during a family leave.
  • Front.poles
    MOVING EAST—Utility workers continue their slow progress east along U.S. 20 south of Morenci. New electrical poles are put in place before wiring is moved into place.
  • Front.cowboy
    A PERFORMER named Biligbaatar, a member of the AnDa Union troupe from Inner Mongolia, dances at Stair District Library last week during a visit to the Midwest. The nine-member group blends a variety of traditions from Inner and Outer Mongolia. The music is described as drawing from “all the Mongol tribes that Genghis Khan unified.” The group considers itself music gatherers whose goal is to preserve traditional sounds of Mongolia. Biligbaatar grew up among traditional herders who live in yurts. Additional photos are on the back page of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.bear
    HOLDEN HUTCHISON gives a hug to a black bear cub—the product of a taxidermist’s skills—at the Michigan DNR’s Great Youth Jamboree. The event on Sunday marked the fourth year of the Jamboree. Additional photos are on page 12.

Weekly newspaper serving SE Michigan and NW Ohio - State Line Observer ©2006-2016