The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
  • Front.winner
    REFEREE Camden Miller raises the hand of Morenci Jr. Dawgs wrestler Ryder Ryan as his opponent leaves the mat in disappointment. Morenci’s youth wrestling program served as host for a tournament Saturday morning to raise money for the club. Additional photos are on the back page.
  • Front.bank.2
    SHERWOOD STATE Bank opened its Fayette office at a grand opening Friday morning, drawing a large crowd to view the renovated building. Above, Burt Blue talks to teller Cindy Funk, while his wife, Jackie, looks around the new office. The Blues missed the opening and took a quick tour on Tuesday. Few traces remain of the former grocery store and theater, however, part of the original brick wall still shows in the hallway leading to the back of the building. The drive-through window should be ready for customers later in the month.
  • Front.carry.casket
    CARRYING—Riley Terry (blue jacket) and Mason Vaughn lead the way, carrying an empty casket outside to the hearse waiting at the curb. Morenci juniors and seniors visited Eagle Funeral Home last week to learn about the role of a funeral director and to understand the process of arranging for a funeral.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.make.three
    FROM THE LEFT, Landon Wilkins, Ryan White and Logan Blaker try out their artistic skills Saturday afternoon at the Morenci PTO’s first Date to Create event. More than 50 people showed up to create decorated planks of wood to hang from rope. The event served as a fund-raiser for miscellaneous PTO projects. Additional photos are on the back of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.F.office
    NEW OFFICES—Fayette village administrator Steve Blue speaks with tax administrator Genna Biddix at the new front desk of the village office. Village council members voted to use budgeted renovation funds targeted for the old office and instead buy the vacant bank building on the corner of Main and Fayette streets. The old office was sold to Sherwood State Bank. When everything is put into place in the spacious new village office, an open house will be scheduled. Council member David Wheeler donated all of his time needed to make changes in the bank interior to fit the Village’s needs.

Geocaching at Ohio historical sites 7.16

Written by David Green.

The Ohio Historical Society (OHS) has seized the opportunity presented by the geocaching craze to place caches at 10 of its historic sites to help increase awareness and visitation. Caches are hidden at: Adena Mansion & Gardens in Chillicothe, Armstrong Air & Space Museum in Wapakoneta, Cedar Bog near Urbana, Flint Ridge near Brownsville, Fort Ancient near Oregonia, Fort Meigs in Perrysburg, Hayes Presidential Center in Fremont, National Road/Zane Grey Museum near Nowich, Piqua Historical Area in Piqua and Serpent Mound near Peebles.

Geocaching is a combination of a treasure hunt and a hike that requires the use of a global positioning system (GPS) receiver. While some people define it as a sport and others a hobby, it is an activity that can be enjoyed individually or with groups of friends or family. The objective of geocaching is to locate hidden "caches" using GPS technology and a little sleuthing. A cache is a waterproof box that contains a log book for all successful searchers to sign and few small trinkets like foreign currency, small rubber animals, stickers and toy action figures that geocachers exchange with each other.

Favorite OHS caches seem to be the Armstrong Air & Space Museum’s “One Small Step for Everyone,” Fort Meigs’ “The British Are Coming!” and Serpent Mound’s “Snake in the Grass,” according to Erin Bartlett, a regional manager for OHS historic sites who coordinates the Society’s geocaching program. “Two interests that Ohio Historical Society visitors and geocachers have in common are history and the environment,” Bartlett said.

J.B. Berry, a biology teacher from Friendship, Ohio, and long-time geocacher and environmentalist, cites Serpent Mound’s “Snake in the Grass” as his favorite. He lives nearby, visits the site frequently and, as a science educator, has placed his own earthcache on a nature trail there.

Until OHS got involved with caches, Berry admits there were many sites he had not visited. The Piqua Historical Area was one of those. He now acknowledges that the three-hour trip from his southern Ohio home to the Piqua Historical Area’s “Treasure of the Upper Miami” cache was “well worth it.”

Berry was excited when OHS placed caches on eight sites across the state because, as he says, it’s a “double bonus for all geocachers: mixing history and the love of nature.”

 “Introducing people to Ohio history, no matter where they live, is our main goal,” said Bartlett. “We’re thrilled with the response to our historic caches and expect more and more cachers to visit OHS sites in the future—especially now that Ohio travelers want to stay close to home to save on gas.”

OHS caches are during daylight hours year-round and many the historic sites on which they’re placed are open to visitors. Cachers who want to place their own cache at an OHS site can fill out an online application. Information on OHS sites and caches can be found at www.ohiohistory.org/geocache and at www.geocaching.com.

The Ohio Historical Society is a private, nonprofit organization that serves as the state’s partner in preserving and interpreting Ohio’s history, archaeology and natural history. For more information about OHS programs and events, call 800.686.6124 or go online to www.ohiohistory.org.

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